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making nails last longer
#1
I am a new nail tech and I am struggling with making my clients nails last more than a few days without chipping. I have been using a UV topcoat over regular nail polish and have also tried the Gelish line. The Gelish is lasting a little longer, but I am still having some clients say that their nails are chipping after a day or two. Help! I am really starting to build my business and I don't want to lose them already because of something I could be doing differently.
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#2
I use Gelish too and one thing that helped me was wiping the nail really clean before applying any product. Good preparation will save you a lot of headaches. Give it the time it deserves and good luck!
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#3
(12-13-2013, 01:18 PM)TRidge Wrote: I use Gelish too and one thing that helped me was wiping the nail really clean before applying any product. Good preparation will save you a lot of headaches. Give it the time it deserves and good luck!


Have you had any problems with it shrinking up around the edges before (or after) you cure the polish? Thats been my only real problem with the Gelish.
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#4
Hello,

If you are doing a regular manicure make sure you are cleaning the nail properly with a purifier to remove any dust or oil from the natural nails. If you use a particular polish line make sure you use the same base and top coat.
If you are using a UV or LED polish line the manicure will last up to two weeks . However, you will have to use all the products and follow the steps as instructed. Whether you use Gelish, Shellac or Perfect match, each product line has its own prep instructions and application instructions so your service will last. We offer hands on instruction and free demos at our Supply.

We do not recommend using a UV product over natural polish to dry the polish. UV is supposed to be used over UV Gel products if not it will crack and peel the polish.

Hope this will help!
~Ros
Wholesale Beauty Supply Distributor & Professional
abcnails.com
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#5
Could you clarify what service you are having problems with? Are these clients paying for natural nail manicure, gel polish, or polish on acrylics? I don't know how to answer you without that info, since you mention using regular polish with a UV top coat and also Gelish. Unless I'm really lost and Gelish also sells regular nail polish...
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
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#6
(12-13-2013, 03:16 PM)CandiceAE Wrote: Could you clarify what service you are having problems with? Are these clients paying for natural nail manicure, gel polish, or polish on acrylics? I don't know how to answer you without that info, since you mention using regular polish with a UV top coat and also Gelish. Unless I'm really lost and Gelish also sells regular nail polish...


I'm offering both Gelish and natural nail polishes. I have had problems with the Gelish shrinking up around the sides, almost like water on oily skin... and I've been using a UV top coat over regular nail polish. I have been letting the regular polish dry for 20+ mins before putting the UV over it, and it still seems to be peeling relatively quickly, sometimes after just one day. I have been cleaning the nail and prepping them like I should and still having problems.
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#7
Gelish you are having what is called "shrink back" I'll give you some tips n a sec... as far as the UV over polish.. if its a "hard" must be filed off type. generally speaking thats not going to work.. some say they get it to work , but its not supposed to.. I never had any good experience with it myself.. there is at least one brand that says it will work over polish but I can never remember which one it is.. reasoning is the UV top os too hard and it does not allow the solvents from the polish to evaporate - something body shop guys call "wicking off" which causes wrinkling the the car paint..

so back to your shrinkage issues..
Too much base coat. If you're applying too much base, you're going to have a wetter "sticky coat" after the cure. So try using much less base. To be honest, you only "need" enough to cover that nail and protect it from the pigments. This will save you a ton of money in the long run.

Too thick a base layer, when cured, will leave too much sticky residue layer. Too much sticky residue layer will cause the color layers to "float" and visual shrinkage can be seen at the tips, but sometimes around the entire perimeter of the nail plate. Your clients will experience an excessive amount of lifting and or peeling rather quickly. I know several technicians who have started to apply the base coats of the "bottle brands" with a gel brush rather than the polish brushes.

Dry wiping:
Using a clean lint free wipe or clean dry gel brush, just wipe off some of the sticky residue layer from the base and proceed with your color layers.

Another suggestion is to clean the sticky residue layer after curing the base, take a quick white block to the nails to lightly rough them up, giving the your color layers something to adhere to.

How to get your base REALLY THIN:
Some technicians who use bottle brands of UVGP are using a gel brush for the base coat application. This helps REALLY get the base REALLY thin. Pick up a small amount of base on a gel brush, tap it to 3-5 nails. Spread the base in a circular motion, cuticle to free edge, almost as if you are scrubbing it in. When the nail is covered, pull down, cuticle to free edge, almost wiping it all off. You should feel some resistance. Cure the proper amount of time for the product. Remember that the base usually cures a different amount of time than the color layers.

Are you stirring/shaking the bottles? (BeautyTech Shoppe has a great stir stick for only $5)

Warm rooms can be a problem, the hotter a room (salon) the more the gel slips and slides. If you're working in a warm salon you might experience creeping back at the free edge. You shouldn't see any creeping back around the skin. (if you see this, then oils were somehow left behind during your prep). Storing your gel somewhere cool before you use it will help.

Regards,
Debbie webmaster - admin
BeautyTech.com Feed Your Nail Addiction
NailTech.com shop smart, brand name professional products for professional results

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#8
(12-17-2013, 11:36 PM)BeautyTech.com Wrote: Gelish you are having what is called "shrink back" I'll give you some tips n a sec... as far as the UV over polish.. if its a "hard" must be filed off type. generally speaking thats not going to work.. some say they get it to work , but its not supposed to.. I never had any good experience with it myself.. there is at least one brand that says it will work over polish but I can never remember which one it is.. reasoning is the UV top os too hard and it does not allow the solvents from the polish to evaporate - something body shop guys call "wicking off" which causes wrinkling the the car paint..

so back to your shrinkage issues..
Too much base coat. If you're applying too much base, you're going to have a wetter "sticky coat" after the cure. So try using much less base. To be honest, you only "need" enough to cover that nail and protect it from the pigments. This will save you a ton of money in the long run.

Too thick a base layer, when cured, will leave too much sticky residue layer. Too much sticky residue layer will cause the color layers to "float" and visual shrinkage can be seen at the tips, but sometimes around the entire perimeter of the nail plate. Your clients will experience an excessive amount of lifting and or peeling rather quickly. I know several technicians who have started to apply the base coats of the "bottle brands" with a gel brush rather than the polish brushes.

Dry wiping:
Using a clean lint free wipe or clean dry gel brush, just wipe off some of the sticky residue layer from the base and proceed with your color layers.

Another suggestion is to clean the sticky residue layer after curing the base, take a quick white block to the nails to lightly rough them up, giving the your color layers something to adhere to.

How to get your base REALLY THIN:
Some technicians who use bottle brands of UVGP are using a gel brush for the base coat application. This helps REALLY get the base REALLY thin. Pick up a small amount of base on a gel brush, tap it to 3-5 nails. Spread the base in a circular motion, cuticle to free edge, almost as if you are scrubbing it in. When the nail is covered, pull down, cuticle to free edge, almost wiping it all off. You should feel some resistance. Cure the proper amount of time for the product. Remember that the base usually cures a different amount of time than the color layers.

Are you stirring/shaking the bottles? (BeautyTech Shoppe has a great stir stick for only $5)

Warm rooms can be a problem, the hotter a room (salon) the more the gel slips and slides. If you're working in a warm salon you might experience creeping back at the free edge. You shouldn't see any creeping back around the skin. (if you see this, then oils were somehow left behind during your prep). Storing your gel somewhere cool before you use it will help.


Thank you so much for this information! I will try these things and see if I get some better results! Again Thank You!
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#9
Debbie's right that the shrinkage is likely caused by using too much products for ANY layer, both base coats, color and top coats. These ideas (dry wiping or buffing) might help, but those techniques (especially buffing) can really slow your service times down. If you're putting on the layers thin enough then they won't be necessary. Next time, try to do each and every layer super thin, almost like you don't think you're putting enough product down to cover the nail, but just keep brushing that little bit on until you have some all over. The base coat can feel a bit like you're dragging the brush, but when you get to the color coats it will feel smoother.

When you're doing these super think coats, you might think that you won't get full color coverage with such thin layers, but you will almost always still achieve great full-bodied color once you get that second coat on. Worst case scenario you'll have to do a third layer with some colors. At least, I've found this to be true with Cuccio, Mani-Q & Gelish, which are the lines that I currently use.

One other thought - some clients with oily nail plates, or those who put lotion/cuticle on that day before coming in… it helps to double cleanse their nails and make sure they are bone dry before you begin with product application.

I can't help with the regular polish, since I don't ever try to use a UV top coat on it. I know there are some who do with some success, but I have no idea what their process is.

Hope this helps!
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
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#10
(12-13-2013, 10:48 AM)alove57 Wrote: I am a new nail tech and I am struggling with making my clients nails last more than a few days without chipping. I have been using a UV topcoat over regular nail polish and have also tried the Gelish line. The Gelish is lasting a little longer, but I am still having some clients say that their nails are chipping after a day or two. Help! I am really starting to build my business and I don't want to lose them already because of something I could be doing differently.


I read this somewhere. I have not tried it. For regular polish, use a protein bonder after cleaning and dehydrating the nail plate. Then use a base coat and top coat that are designed to work together. The person posting this information says her clients get a week of wear with just a bit of tip wear. Try it on yourself or a friend before you use it on your clients.

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