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Newbie Questions
#1
Hello,

I'm in my 2nd week of classes. Anyone who has read my post know I'm more interested in opening a salon then being a full time nail tech. I actually want to be more into the hair removal area but I am going the proper route I believe to achieve me (longer term) goal.

I do have a few questions that I hope you will answer
- I know I will not learn how to do "much" until I work in a salon but once I graduate will I know how to do a proper set of acrylics? Manicures?
-Are there really salons that hire people fresh out of school? I took a threading course and NO ONE will give me a job because I have no experience, yet doing only a few friends and employees doesn't really increase my skill. I'm afraid of having the same problem with nails.
- In your opinion, do you believe that 6 to 8 months of salon work is enough time to go booth renter?
Thank you very much in advance for answering my questions.
NY Licensed Nail + Waxing Tech
Owner/Developer Suite Tee
http://www.Facebook.com/TashawnaH
Instagram: @SuiteTee
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#2
Quote:I do have a few questions that I hope you will answer:
- I know I will not learn how to do "much" until I work in a salon but once I graduate will I know how to do a proper set of acrylics? Manicures?
-Are there really salons that hire people fresh out of school? I took a threading course and NO ONE will give me a job because I have no experience, yet doing only a few friends and employees doesn't really increase my skill. I'm afraid of having the same problem with nails.
- In your opinion, do you believe that 6 to 8 months of salon work is enough time to go booth renter?

1) Most likely you will learn the basics of how to do Acrylics, Manicures and Pedicures.

2) I think you will find a salon that is willing to hire you, if you are enthusiastic and honest about your skills.

That's all I can answer, hope it helps you.
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#3
Thank you!
NY Licensed Nail + Waxing Tech
Owner/Developer Suite Tee
http://www.Facebook.com/TashawnaH
Instagram: @SuiteTee
 Reply
#4
- I know I will not learn how to do "much" until I work in a salon but once I graduate will I know how to do a proper set of acrylics? Manicures?
Whether you'll be able to do a proper set of acrylics will depend on your teacher. If she's like most, a retired hair stylist who rarely did nails, it's up to you to do the 'homework' involved in learning. You'll need to practice and pick our brains here to find out what you need to know. Post your pix so we can point out areas that need work.
-Are there really salons that hire people fresh out of school? I took a threading course and NO ONE will give me a job because I have no experience, yet doing only a few friends and employees doesn't really increase my skill. I'm afraid of having the same problem with nails.
That's the norm, I'm afraid. The salons want to make money and if you're going in on commission, which is what I highly recommend starting out, then you're not going to be bring in much money. If you're skills are better than most coming out of school and you can find a salon who's willing to promote you, you stand a much better chance of making money for yourself and the salon.
- In your opinion, do you believe that 6 to 8 months of salon work is enough time to go booth renter?
Time isn't what you wait for, it's the MONEY! You don't go out on your own til you have enough clientel to support yourself and your expenses. If you're work is good and you've got a great work ethic, you can make the move sooner, otherwise it can take up to a year.
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#5
First congrats on having direction toward what you want to do long term! Keep at it and you will succeed!

> I do have a few questions that I hope you will answer:
> - I know I will not learn how to do "much" until I work in a salon but once
> I graduate will I know how to do a proper set of acrylics? Manicures?

You will know HOW to do them, but doing them well typically takes lots of practice. As does learning how to troubleshoot problems.

> -Are there really salons that hire people fresh out of school? I took a threading
> course and NO ONE will give me a job because I have no experience, yet doing
> only a few friends and employees doesn't really increase my skill. I'm afraid
> of having the same problem with nails.

Look for high end chain salons or natural nail salons. Because they don't do enhancements, the increased skill levels aren't necessary. On the other hand, it means you won't be doing the necessary practice to improve your enhancement services. Sports clubs and larger spas are where you will be more likely to find a job.

> - In your opinion, do you believe that 6 to 8 months of salon work is enough
> time to go booth renter?

That depends entirely on how well you build your clientele. You'll need to offer promotions that bring people in the door, do a good job then get great reviews and get them posted online for others to find you. Once you get to the 6 month mark, calculate what you would make with your current client base as a booth renter and see if it is enough income for you. Some can build a full 85%+ clientele in a year, for some it takes many years. Location, promotions and salon loyalty all play a part when you move to a salon to be a booth renter.
Jessica Hoel
Nail Professional
Akzentz Distributor & Educator
http://www.luvnailz.com
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#6
Tashawna :
> Hello,
>
> I'm in my 2nd week of classes. Anyone who has read my post know I'm more interested
> in opening a salon then being a full time nail tech. I actually want to be
> more into the hair removal area but I am going the proper route I believe to
> achieve me (longer term) goal.
>
> I do have a few questions that I hope you will answer:
> - I know I will not learn how to do "much" until I work in a salon but once
> I graduate will I know how to do a proper set of acrylics? Manicures?
When I graduated(this past Feb mind you), I could do a great manicure. That is because when I was in school, my teacher (who is still a licensed nail tech) had us doing a manicure *at least* every other day. But Im sure I did at least one manicure every day. My acrylic skills were NOT as good. I know that is directly correlated to us using the odorless system and NOT PRACTICING that skill as much. When I graduated, I started giving acrylic enhancements to all my friends whenever they would let me. NOW I can say I can do a 'proper set' set of acrylic nails, but a month ago? No. I had to practice, practice PRACTICE.
> -Are there really salons that hire people fresh out of school? I took a threading
> course and NO ONE will give me a job because I have no experience, yet doing
> only a few friends and employees doesn't really increase my skill. I'm afraid
> of having the same problem with nails.
I was hired by a salon right out of school, but they didnt let me give a client any enhancements! :lol: But I wouldnt have charged anyone money either, because I wasnt confident my own skills. But all natural nail services, including gel polishes, they let me perform on the clients. I think it largely depends on your market
> - In your opinion, do you believe that 6 to 8 months of salon work is enough
> time to go booth renter?
I dont know the answer to this question, because I've always worked on comission but I understand from my colleagues who do booth rent, you need to have a strong clientele base that will come back for services to guarantee you'll be able to pay for your booth rent.> Thank you very much in advance for answering my questions.
naturale.bigcartel.com
Natural hair and body care. Custom Made hand and body butters, all crafter with 100% natural ingredients! We have Hand and Foot Sugar Scrubs as well Smile
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#7
Quote:- I know I will not learn how to do "much" until I work in a salon but once I graduate will I know how to do a proper set of acrylics? Manicures?

That's entirely up to what you do with your time at school. For my 6 week nails course in cosmo, I had a teacher that couldn't do nails worth a flip, but I got my happy butt online and looked up every video and tutorial and instruction pamphlet I could find, and I ended up being the only person at my school that could not only do a set of nails, but do art nails also. You have to want to learn to be able to learn... Practice your butt off and you'll do great! (also, in my experience, the products you get in your school kit aren't fab, but if you can do a good looking set with IT, then you'll be fine.)

Quote:-Are there really salons that hire people fresh out of school? I took a threading course and NO ONE will give me a job because I have no experience, yet doing only a few friends and employees doesn't really increase my skill. I'm afraid of having the same problem with nails.
Market yourself... I got hired by a really nice salon straight off the clinic floor at the school... because i showed that I had confidence in what I was doing and I made sure that I knew every service the entire program offered, no matter what it was or what clientelle it was marketed to. It makes a huge difference.
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#8
Hi! Everyone offered up some good advice but i wanted to share what i did when i first started. I vowed to myself that i wouldnt get out there and not know what i was doing. So i picked a couple of salons that i knew did good work and had a good reputation...and went in and asked the nail tech( s) if i could sit and watch them. I learn by seeing and it really helped me a great deal. Not only was Gina a fabulous nail tech-- but she was (& still is) and educator for CND. she taught me soooo much and was so sweet. She wasnt threatenex at all and really shared everytg with me. She gave me a ton of product, some of her old brushes and best of all--- her knowledge.
It waz a wonderful experience that i will never forget!
but u will need to find someone who is very confident in their skills cuz alot of techs are extremely teritorial and would be threatened by you.
I also wanted to tell you that i would focus on just gettimg through school and learning all you can. It wld not be in your best interest to try to booth rent right away. Find a place and stay there!!! Dont salon hop. Thats the worst thing for your career. Ok??
Hope i helped some and hang in there!!
" Take time.....to be kind".....
Angel
~Tracy~

Full Time single mom,
Medical Receptionist &
Part Time Nail Artist
Akron, OH
 Reply

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