You are not logged in or registered. Please login or register to use the full functionality of this board...
Hello There, Guest!

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Doug Schoons FB post on LED. Good to know.
#1
Quote:Doug Schoon
There is no such thing as "LED light". LED is a type of light bulb that produce UV light. If an LED lamp cures a UV gel more quickly, that's because the lamp is creating more UV light.
This is great to know, as I was one of those under the impression that LED was was different as in skin contact. They would advertise as no skin damage for these lights in nailpro. I want to say in that ad for the polygel typ nails.
 Reply
#2
There does seem to be confusion over which light or lamp is better or safer etc..

Since LED is acronym for Light Emitting Diode, it just describes the source of the light, not what kind of light. Has nothing to do with how safe/unsafe the light emitted from said diodes would be.

The only safety advantage they would have is that they are usually made from plastic and do not break so you wouldn't have broken glass if a lamp hit the floor.
 Reply
#3
So if a LED light is in fact just a higher concentration of UV wattage-- why cant Shellac be cured by it? Im gonna try it next week bcuz i LOVE OPIs new gelcolor system. Its so fast and shiny...Love it!! CND needs to get with the program and get up to speed with texhnology
..dont ya think??
" Take time.....to be kind".....
Angel
~Tracy~

Full Time single mom,
Medical Receptionist &
Part Time Nail Artist
Akron, OH
 Reply
#4
Think of UV light as a range of light on, lets say a ruler. The Phillips bulbs that CND uses gives off light in the range of, lets say the 1 to the 12 on the ruler. That is the range. Shellac cures somewhere in that range (I don't know where, they don't tell you that). Could even be that some Shellac cures at different wavelengths on the range, like Wildfire around the 2 and Black Pool around the 6 (it's possible, I dont' know this theory to be true).

Ok, now the LED range (wavelength) is much narrower. So for comparison purposes lets say it cures really fast, but only between the 4 and 6 on the ruler for example. So, that is why you need to use the UV fluorescent bulbs to cure Shellac.

Gelish must be formulated to cure in the narrow range of the LED light that they sell. Same for OPI.

I hope this helps instead of confusing the heck out of you Smile
 Reply
#5
Elaine watson's post on it brings the info to most simplest terms on her FB.

Two chemicals
One cures in UV
One cures in LED

If product has both it, it be cured in both UV and LED.

If not then it can only be cured in the light it is instructed to be used.
Anna
 Reply
#6
Thank you Sobeit!! very interesting, I was still confused about that too :? , wonderful answers from everybody.

But this is interesting (weird) when I was an intern in a Spa, and they were busy as they only had one lamp for shellac, instead they were using the LCN led sky lamp to cure shellac, and it worked fine, I was curious and I ask the client to let me see her nails before she leave the salon.
So I can say from what I saw that Shellac will cure under a led light.

It makes sense to me now that I know that LED it is in fact UV light.
Confusedhock:
 Reply
#7
Wow that isss interesting!! For purely arguments sake im going to use my OPIlight and do shellac on myself and see. I will report back next week!! Maybe the LCN light was different somehow?? But im gonna try Smile Smile
" Take time.....to be kind".....
Angel
~Tracy~

Full Time single mom,
Medical Receptionist &
Part Time Nail Artist
Akron, OH
 Reply
#8
Quote:anointdhndz :
> Wow that isss interesting!! For purely arguments sake im going to use my OPIlight
> and do shellac on myself and see. I will report back next week!! Maybe the
> LCN light was different somehow?? But im gonna try Smile Smile

Hi Tracy, I am curious too, so I will be back to see your report Big Grin :wink:
 Reply
#9
Actually, I think that's a really good explanation. And I am glad to see the issue of LED vs CFL UV light being addressed. When it comes to UV light, the devil is in the wavelength and whether it's the right wavelength for the product. There's a couple of really good articles about it http://www.nailsmag.com/article/91808/th...els?Page=4 and http://www.nailsmag.com/article/93494/uv-or-not-uv

I, too, wish that Shellac would cure under LED - yes, I know that some people have gotten some colours to cure under LED, but it is not clear that it is a good cure, and it is hit or miss. While it's easy to spot a bad cure, it's not so easy to detect an "almost right" cure. And undercures can cause allergic reactions, so it's critical to get the cure right. According to CND, because photoinitiators are often the cause of sensitivity, there are fewer/different photoinitiators in Shellac. It is also why Shellac claims to be hypoallergenic. http://www.cnd.com/Products/PDF/4965_She...nsumer.pdf


kkgunn :
> Think of UV light as a range of light on, lets say a ruler. The Phillips bulbs
> that CND uses gives off light in the range of, lets say the 1 to the 12 on
> the ruler. That is the range. Shellac cures somewhere in that range (I don't
> know where, they don't tell you that). Could even be that some Shellac cures
> at different wavelengths on the range, like Wildfire around the 2 and Black
> Pool around the 6 (it's possible, I dont' know this theory to be true).
>
> Ok, now the LED range (wavelength) is much narrower. So for comparison purposes
> lets say it cures really fast, but only between the 4 and 6 on the ruler for
> example. So, that is why you need to use the UV fluorescent bulbs to cure
> Shellac.
>
> Gelish must be formulated to cure in the narrow range of the LED light that
> they sell. Same for OPI.
>
> I hope this helps instead of confusing the heck out of you Smile
 Reply
#10
Thank you for all that info and those links Nancy. Very helpful and with all the new products and technology coming out, we need all the help we can get. I for one was very confused and if I could find the ad I would link it, where they claim that LED is skin safe while UV was causing exposure. I will keep looking.
 Reply
#11
Tracy,
I used my OPI light for Shellac many times and never had a problem with it. It was the reg UV light nothing LED.
But of course, CND says you HAVE to use their lamp to cure Shellac. I just don't see the need. JMHO
 Reply
#12
Light Elegance did a study on the UV out put on all the top brands of lights on the market. CND and Light elegance were the highest out put with O.P.I in the mid rage. I for one will not be getting an LED light till it has been out for longer then a few months. I like to let the bugs get worked out of a product before i dive in head and wallet 1st. I am sure that CND is, like with all their product, testing and working on an LED product but will not put it out till it is right.
"To put it bluntly, I seem to have a whole superstructure with no foundation. But I'm working on the foundation."
Marilyn Monroe
https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000798439789
 Reply
#13
I think there has been some great sharing here, thanks ladies!

One thing I do know is that if you invest and use an LED lamp, keep your bulb lamp as a backup. When those LED lamps stop working, your done right there and then. Most will probably carry a 1 year warranty some maybe more. You can't just pop in a new bulb. They are electronic so as with all electronics, they can be unpredictable.

Now, I have some reading to do from the great links in this post.
Ellen Torchia
Owner Too Much Fun
President SB&S Graphics, Inc
Replicator Graphics

Former Top 10 Competitor

"A mind once stretched by the imagination never regains it's original form."
 Reply
#14
Oh boy it sounds like we all need to get our wording and terms on the same page here!

I will explain what I mean. We all use lamps to cure gels, hard, soft and UVGP. Some of these lamps are UV bulbs and some are LED bulbs. The UV bulbs are actually referred to an "lamps" in the manufacturing side of the industry and the units themselves - which contain the "lamps" and all the electronics and covering etc) are referred to as - darn it I can not find the email now with the term, but it was not the word LAMP.

One thing I do know for sure, that if a gel was not formulated to cure in a LED type unit, it will not. It MAY appear to be cured, but chances are it has not fully cured properly and you will be running the risk of over exposure to both your client and yourself over time.

Quote:Anything not marketed or advertised as "curing in an LED" will definitely "NOT" cure in an LED lamp. I am 100% sure of this. In order for a product to cure in a UV Lamp, we have to add an initiator that reacts to the UV rays. The same for LED. We have to add an initiator that reacts to a LED ray. IF the product cures in both units...BOTH initiators have to be added.
Elaine Watson, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, Global Education Director
Lorraine, webgirl
http://www.ManicuresThatLast.com
eco Soak Off UV Gel Polish No Solvents, Double the Size - Same Price!
Cinapro Nail Creations - New Art Kits!
http://www.ScentualSpaProducts.com
Cuccio Natural - Enhance the Spa Experience
Free Shipping on all orders over $75
 Reply

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread
Author
  /  
Last Post
Replies: 3
Views: 2,636
04-01-2014, 07:21 AM
Last Postwawaseefriend
Replies: 0
Views: 1,068
03-20-2014, 06:09 PM
Last PostNTR_Braden
Replies: 3
Views: 2,360
03-08-2014, 01:35 AM
Last Postyknail.com
Replies: 9
Views: 5,201
03-04-2014, 09:28 PM
Last Postjennie
Replies: 3
Views: 2,683
01-23-2014, 11:59 AM
Last Postlilsquirrel428
Replies: 3
Views: 2,863
12-22-2013, 02:59 PM
Last PostVimz
Replies: 2
Views: 2,508
07-19-2013, 06:58 PM
Last PostNails4ever
Replies: 7
Views: 5,631
01-25-2013, 05:03 PM
Last PostMelissa82
Replies: 3
Views: 3,203
11-12-2012, 12:18 AM
Last PostLuvglitter

 
Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)