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Hypoallergenic Gels
#1
I was browsing another online forum and they were saying that CND gels, like Shellac and Brisa are hypoallergenic and they are the only ones known on the market to be. Is this true? I've been reading that a lot of people are getting contact dermatitis from Gelish and other gels. What about Light Elegance or Young Nails?
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#2
You need to go on Doug Schoons FB page and ask that question...he'll give the right scientific answer.
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#3
I did find a listing that said LE is hypoallergenic. I'm using nailite soak off on myself right now but I placed an order for some nailite and I have a sample kit from YN.

I did post the question to his FB page, though!
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#4
Hypoallergenic is a marketing term. It is not regulated and anyone can call their product hypoallergenic. Hypoallergenic means it is less likley to cause allergies then the most allergenic thing. Most gels are hypoallergenic, because there is one type of gel that only a few companys use anymore that makes people break out like crazy. Gelousy gel is hypoallergenic, not that it really means anything substantial.
Erick Westcott, CEO
Gelousy Gel Nail Systems
http://gelousy.com
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#5
CND do claim to be 3 free, this means they are hypoallergenic cause they do not have certain commonly known allergens in their gels but I can't remember the name of them, I would go to the CND website and see what you can find out or ask them direct by contacting them.
No company can claim something if it's not true when it comes to what ingredients are in or not in products, so I can't see CND claiming something like this if it's not true, they wouldn't risk their reputation on something like this.
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#6
(10-29-2012, 04:19 AM)wooshka Wrote: CND do claim to be 3 free, this means they are hypoallergenic cause they do not have certain commonly known allergens in their gels but I can't remember the name of them, I would go to the CND website and see what you can find out or ask them direct by contacting them.
No company can claim something if it's not true when it comes to what ingredients are in or not in products, so I can't see CND claiming something like this if it's not true, they wouldn't risk their reputation on something like this.


It's not a matter of it not being true, it's simply that the word is not defined in any scientific way; it is a marketing term. People think that hypoallergenic means that you won't be allergic to it, but it doesn't mean that. Hypo simply means under or less than normal. CND does use different and fewer photoinitiators than other brands and it is photoinitiators that tend to be the cause of allergic reactions in gel polishes. Many people who can't use other gel polishes can use Shellac. But that doesn't mean that Shellac can't/won't cause allergic reactions, just that it is less likely to do so.
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#7
Here is Doug Schoon's response on FB

Dear Melissa,
It sounds like you are putting too much faith in the term "hypoallergenic", which often misleads consumers. ALL UV gels may cause adverse skin reactions and there are NO exceptions! Hypoallergenic simply suggestes that although the UV gel can cause allergies, it may be less likely to cause allergies than other UV gels. All UV gels must be kept off the skin; which includes uncured product and even improperly cured filings, as well as the gooey surface inhibition layer. There are several articles posted on my website which discuss this issue; including a brochure I helped write from the Nail Manufacturers Council on Safety (NMC), entitled, "Guidelines for Controlling and Minimizing Skin Exposure to Nail Products" also, I have an article on my website entitled, "Seven Secrets to Curing UV Gel Nails". AND I discussed this issue in my book, "Nail Structure & Product Chemistry", Second Edition. This is a big issue that all nail professionals should be very aware of, so please check out this information and share it with others.
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#8
Thanks for posting that!
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#9
Well, the fact is that some gels are more likely to develop allergies and others are not. I know of several people who developed dermatitis with products x, y and z and when they switch to product m or n, the problems disappear. Yes, it's a marketing term and one that's easy to write and difficult to prove. But the differences do exist and it depends on the chemicals used in the gels. Rather than believe the term hypoallergenic, share experiences on a forum such as this and the truth will become clear.
Iryna Giblett Nail Products Inc., Sweden
http://www.irynagiblett.com
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