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Air purifier
#1
Looking to purchase an air purifier for a small room to diminish the acrylic smell. Anyone have any suggestions or the comments on the ones that you are using.
Rockstar Nails by Christee
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#2
THere are two possibilities. Either you buy a system that vents the air to the outside, or you buy a chemical filter system that cleans the air and returns it to the room. Chemical filter systems have the advantage that they are not a fixed installation, so you can move them around the room or to a new salon if required later.

There are two serious chemical filter systems that I am aware of made by Aerovex Systems (http://www.aerovexsystems.com/salons/sou...s.tpl.html) and a Swedish company called Filtronic that as far as I know does not distribute in the USA at the moment (http://filtronic.se/beauty-line.aspx).

Being based in Sweden, we use Filtronic and have just become their exclusive agent for Ukraine and Russia.

The thing to note about both filters is their size. When it comes to cleaning air effectively size matters! What you want from a filter is that it sucks in enough air to take nearly all particles and "smells", gives you a large enough working area, but is quiet enough to not be irritating when used all day. A small filter simply can't present enough internal filter area to the air to be effective, unless the air speed is slow - and then it gives a very small working area and probably won't capture all the particles. For that reason, I don't consider any desk-mounted filter to be more than a simple dust-catcher - at least not until I have seen independent research which states the effectiveness of these filters.

The Filtronic system has been tested by an independent test lab and shown to remove 99.95% of all particulates when making either gel or acrylic nails. The unit is so safe that it is the only chemical filter system to be approved for use in nail schools by the Swedish Heath and Safety at Work department (since last year it is mandatory that all nail schools have an effective air-quality ventilation system and each is inspected). Sweden being Sweden and exceptionally interested in safety at work and environmental issues, many nail salons also now use the Filtronic system out of choice and in order to protect their health.

It's important to understand how these filters work. They typically have a 3-stage filter process. The first filter grabs the big dust particles (visible), the second filter removes the smaller dust particles (invisible to eye) and the third filter uses activated carbon to attract and retain the chemical particles. If you can imagine, it is not so easy to design a carbon filter that is able to grab the chemical particles as the air blows across the surface. To do this effectively, there must be a large internal surface of the carbon and the air speed must not be too high. It's this design dilemma which essentially dictates the physical size of the filters.

When buying filter system, ask if the system has been independently tested and what %age of dust and chemicals are removed.

At the end, a good filter system is more than a tool to remove smells. It is an investment to protect the nail tech from potentially developing health problems to the extent they can no longer work in the salon. If your health is damaged, it is usually irreversible. I also personally think it's a great marketing tool to show the customers that you are interested in their safety.

It's unfortunate that this issue of safe ventilation is so misunderstood and that there are companies out there selling simple dust-catchers and desk-top filters that appear to offer protection. I wish a nail magazine would grab a few of these and put them through a test lab, so it's clear what does and does not work.

I hope this info helps you ;-)
Bob



Iryna Giblett Nail Products Inc., Sweden
http://www.irynagiblett.com
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#3
This question inspired me to find time to write a blog post ;-) http://irynagiblett.blogspot.se/2012/08/...-safe.html
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Iryna Giblett Nail Products Inc., Sweden
http://www.irynagiblett.com
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#4
Thank you Bob, your information is very helpful.
Rockstar Nails by Christee
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