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hiring help at shop
#1
I'm starting to think about hiring some one to help me at the shop. As an employer, did you decide on commission, hourly, or a little of both?

Any snags to look out for???

Thanks,,,,, Rose
 Reply
#2
I decided to go with employee vs. booth renter. In WA state that means guaranteeing minimum wage as an hourly rate. I came up with a good formula that ensures that I remain profitable - I got the scale from a coaching website, not sure which one now. Basically you take their minimum wage paid for the week, double that and then have a sliding scale commission for dollars above that.

So, if they work 40 hours that would be 40 x 9.07 (WA min. wage) = $362.80 minimum pay check, doubled that's $725.60 in service revenue they would need to generate before getting a commission bump. Commission is only paid on the dollars over double the minimum wage. **They would also be getting their tips on top of the 9.07/hr**

Here's the schedule I came up with - it makes it so that someone could earn a small com. bump even if they were only part time. To reach the high end of the scale they would have to be a productive full time employee. Keep in mind that the scale is based on my service prices - if your prices are lower or higher you would need to adjust the scale. Someone working 40 hrs a week and 90% booked would be pulling roughly 1400/wk in services, based on MY service times, and I schedule pretty loose so I think someone who doesn't have to run the place could easily hit the 1400 without even being full time. Smile Plus I am starting to hit around 40% of service base in retail sales, which I would pay a com. separately on retail.

473.37 591.71 15%
591.72 739.64 22%
739.65 902.00 30%
902.01 1,100.00 40%
1,100.01 1,400.00 50%
1,400.01 2,000.00 55%

Hope that helps and isn't TMI! I recently put word out to hire a nail tech, but the only people who responded aren't willing to learn how to do acrylic or gel, they only want to do natural nails and gel polish, because they had never worked in a salon that offered enhancements!?!? Go figure.
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
 Reply
#3
Rose, no matter where you live, employers need to cover the equivalent of minimum wage for the number of hours their employees are scheduled, whether or not clients are being serviced.
Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
 Reply
#4
(04-30-2012, 08:28 PM)CandiceAE Wrote: I decided to go with employee vs. booth renter. In WA state that means guaranteeing minimum wage as an hourly rate. I came up with a good formula that ensures that I remain profitable - I got the scale from a coaching website, not sure which one now. Basically you take their minimum wage paid for the week, double that and then have a sliding scale commission for dollars above that.

So, if they work 40 hours that would be 40 x 9.07 (WA min. wage) = $362.80 minimum pay check, doubled that's $725.60 in service revenue they would need to generate before getting a commission bump. Commission is only paid on the dollars over double the minimum wage. **They would also be getting their tips on top of the 9.07/hr**

Here's the schedule I came up with - it makes it so that someone could earn a small com. bump even if they were only part time. To reach the high end of the scale they would have to be a productive full time employee. Keep in mind that the scale is based on my service prices - if your prices are lower or higher you would need to adjust the scale. Someone working 40 hrs a week and 90% booked would be pulling roughly 1400/wk in services, based on MY service times, and I schedule pretty loose so I think someone who doesn't have to run the place could easily hit the 1400 without even being full time. Smile Plus I am starting to hit around 40% of service base in retail sales, which I would pay a com. separately on retail.

473.37 591.71 15%
591.72 739.64 22%
739.65 902.00 30%
902.01 1,100.00 40%
1,100.01 1,400.00 50%
1,400.01 2,000.00 55%

Hope that helps and isn't TMI! I recently put word out to hire a nail tech, but the only people who responded aren't willing to learn how to do acrylic or gel, they only want to do natural nails and gel polish, because they had never worked in a salon that offered enhancements!?!? Go figure.

OMG I can only dream someone is willing to teach me acrylic and gel!!
NY Licensed Nail + Waxing Tech
Owner/Developer Suite Tee
http://www.Facebook.com/TashawnaH
Instagram: @SuiteTee
 Reply
#5
That is nuts. I actually had some help learning acrylics from my salon owner, but she is first and foremost a cosmetologist. I would have filed off my perfectly squared left ring finger nail for a salon that offered Acrylic AND gel training from an actual nail tech!!!
 Reply

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