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commision?
#1
I Just checked out a salon that I would like to work at,but its commision,never done that ,always boothrented,She said 50/50 I supply my nail products and implements,she supplies cleaner,for pedi and sanitizer,Is this a good ,regular amount,I dont know Im asking,If anyone can advise please do so ,thanks
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#2
Sorry, but I think that's a terrible commission. 50/50 would be more like close to the top commission for an employee, with the salon owner paying the taxes, products, and everything.
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
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#3
even 60% I never had to supply products, only my implements.
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#4
As a spa owner, you may be skeptical about my advice on this topic, but please read on...I would urge anyone looking at a compensation package to avoid fixating on the commission as a percentage, and instead focus on the amount of money that the commission will yield. In other words, 50% commission can be low or high depending on how much is charged for the service and how long it books out for (e.g. if the salon charges $20 and books you out for an hour, you will be earning $10/hour; however, if the salon charges $50 and books you out for an hour, you will be earning $25 per hour - your tip will also be significantly higher at the place that charges $50/hour). A salon that has a lot of overhead due to spending on things such as: (1) location (rent is higher in more desirable spots with better foot traffic); (2) staffing of high quality front desk receptionist and cleaning assistants; (3) marketing (which will dictate how many new clients come through the business); (4) high-end products; etc., may not be able to offer commissions of 50% or higher because they are spending such a large portion of revenues on operating and growing the business. However, these businesses may be the best to work for (because they are investing in the things that make a business successful), and may yield the highest ultimate pay for its nail techs. Don't assume that 70% commission is better than 30% commission - what matters is how much lands in your paycheck for the time you spend working. Quality of management, co-workers, equipment, supplies, benefits, and volume of new clients should all be considered as well. Thank you for taking the time to think about commissions from this perspective - I hope it is helpful!
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#5
SpaSpaceChicago said it very well:

"what matters is how much lands in your paycheck for the time you spend working"

It's all about how much you take home at the end of the day when you are evaluating compensation. I agree a quality work environment has a great bearing on where you will be happy working. But a true dollars and cents comparison of the take home earnings can give you a better perspective. Busy does not equal profitable in a salon setting. I have seen several salons in our market advertise how "Busy" they are to entice prospective employees, while they are losing money on the majority of their services. That business model will not work long term, and employees that go home broke at the end of the day are not happy, productive long term employees.
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