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Cuticle: Nip or Not to Nip?
#1
Okay, so, I haven't really talked about my experiences out there in Job-Land but my very first Job was essentially a chopshop of a sorts. I won't say where it is out of respect. I have since taken a previous Offer, the Owner was gracious enough to allow me to come back and it's a natural nails place so I wanted to ask some questions about nipping cuticles.

I was shown, at the chopshop, to nip the true cuticle up into the eponychium area. I balked heavily, it's just not my preference; I'm of the School of Thought that a well-used ration of cuticle remover plus a cuticle pusher do wonders and basically clean your nail plate well, and all you get to nip after that, is dead skin.

I'm not comfortable nipping the eponychium area.

Can you kindly help this newbie tech? What should I cut and what should I not cut?

Opinions?
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#2
We all should only be nipping what is hanging off or excess thickness after using a pusher and or cuticle remover. Nipping off all of it will cause them to grow back in thicker and possibly uneven, and cause more hangnails.
I prefer to use cuticle remover and my metal pusher, or curette, then use the towel in a circular motion and rub the remover and bits of pushed cuticle off the nail. Then I can really see if there is any thick or excess growth that will impair my ability to apply any product, I can also see hangnails better as well.
Aggressive pushing and nipping can also detach the cuticle from the nail plate and possibly leave it open to infection.
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#3
Yep, that's my belief too. I think it sealed the deal for me to take the other Job. Well..that and a lot of other stuff I just don't care to discuss here. I still stand on the belief, there's a lot you can do with cuticle remover and appropriate cuticle pushing. I'll never touch the eponychium again. That just freaked me out...no way do I care to touch living skin.

Thanks Peggy!
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#4
It just makes them worse, so I don't understand them wanting to cut all that off. Not only do we need the seal, but I have had more clients complain about the after affects of over nipping more than complain about aggressive filing from some unnamed shops. It's no fun trying to repair that.
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#5
Like I said..one of the reasons I took a much better Offer. I had no idea the place was as it was until I got in there. Sometimes, you just don't know. I won't compromise the health and safety of my clients, especially at my experience level. :/

Once again, I thank you. Smile
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#6
I understand the desire to cut off excess thickess at the cuticle. I just had a client today that is a MAJOR nail biter and her true cuticles were like 2 stories thick, lol. BUT...I refuse to cut off anything that is not TRULY "waving" at me. The reason: they know what their own hands look like and our job is to make THEIR hands look as good as they can...not transform THEIR hands into a "perfect" hand. Not trying to be harsh at all here. It's just reality that some of our clients hands will not look totally great even after cleaning up the nail plate and pushing cuticles and everything that we do in the service. They will love their final look though, because you made them look THEIR best. Just a thought.
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#7
Oh, I definitely trim off excess bulk when they are too thick. I just can't leave that there in the way. To me, it just looks yucky. So I trim it and ask them to get cuticle remover and use their towel to buff if off and keep the overgrowth under control. They call me the cuticle detailer.
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#8
Erin, really the most important thought process is does your state allow cuticle cutting? Many do NOT, NY is one that specifically says no.. (they also specifically say no callus blades). Even if your state does not specifically prohibit, there is always a clause "outside the scope of practice" that would prohibit the use. Just as with the callus blades, one oops and who knows whats going to happen.. does she have a bleeding issue that you were unaware of? some communicable that maybe even SHE is unaware of? We are NOT allowed to cut LIVING TISSUE. If it is standing up and waving yea ok thats fine, but the old Madge method of trimming the cuticle as far back as possible is really a no-no and should not be done anywhere.

There is a thread in the sticky posts section if memory serves..
Regards,
Debbie webmaster - admin
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#9
Debbie, I'm not sure if I can cut cuticles in CA or not, I'm still looking into that.

****

EDITED: Found THIS you put up in the Sticky's. Looks like it solves the Mystery for me and now I feel like I understand.

TY hun!

***
Cuticle is dead skin

It is not the live tissue surrounding the top of the nail plate covering the matrix area

Nipping or cutting of live skin is either prohibited by your state laws or "outside the scope of practice"

If the client has an abundance of CUTICLE on the nail PLATE, then you need to use a quality cuticle remover such as Blue Cross or Prolinc and use the proper tools.. nippers are not for this purpose.. nippers should only be used to clip hangnails or anything "standing up and waving", trimming the eponychium is asking for trouble -- you could cause the client to bleed, break the protective seal and the matrix can become infected, there are dozens of reasons.. This has not nothing to do with looking down on anyone, or "antiquated" practices, it is a legal and health issue. Just because your laws do not specifically state not to cut cuticles (which in itself is wrong terminology) if you are trimming the eponychium - that is live skin and that practice is "outside the scope of practice" That clause is in every state's law somewhere..

Personally I believe that trimming of the eponychium will cause it to grow back thicker.. much like trimming callus back too far.. both are there for a reason, when you remove it the body say "oh no I need more protection in that area" and regenerates growth thicker to protect. Years ago I used to cut/trim my "cuticles" and I noticed they got thicker and thicker, harder, so I stopped and started to use remover and now I do not have this problem any more.

None of us or anyone on this earth is ever too smart to not learn something every day. Just because we have always used the wrong terminology (such as nail mold) does not make it right, it means we need to ALL get with the times, use proper terms, make us true professionals and raise our level of recognition as something beyond the gum snapping manicurist who can't get a job doing anything else. If any of you read my newsletter that went out today you can read for yourself how much I learned last weekend at Orlando, and how much my husband learned. I have been in this business for 16 years..

Courtesy of Nail Structure and Product Chemistry, Doug Schoon, Creative Nail Design, Milady Publishing

Over the years, much confusion has been caused by a misunderstanding of nail anatomy. Some state regulations tell students they can't cut the cuticles, when really they mean the living tissue of the eponychium. Cutting the fold can break the seal and lead to infection. These regulations aren't meant to prevent you from cleaning the nonliving tissue (cuticle) from the nail plate.

Clearly, the confusion can be avoided if we teach clients about the anatomy of the natural nail. While they are marveling at your knowledge, you will be helping eliminate the confusion. And you'll be making a positive contribution to our industry.

The word cuticle is loosely and often incorrectly used. Ask clients to point to their cuticle and they'll most likely point vaguely to the skin at the base of the nail plate-the visible part of the living eponychium-instead of the nonliving tissue that adheres to the nail plate. How did this misconception get started? Surprisingly, it probably started because of some medical text. These few references often simply state that the cuticle is the eponychium, without explaining to the reader that the cuticle sheds from the underside of the eponychium. But the cuticle is only a part of the eponychium. In fact, it is found on the underside of the eponychium, where the tissue sits against the newly forming nail plate. This tissue sticks very tightly to the freshly made nail plate. The tissue binds so tightly that the growing nail plate pulls off a thin layer and drags it along. In other words, the detached tissue "rides" on the nail plate, seeming to grow from under the edge of the nail fold. This thin layer of colorless tissue is the cuticle, the dead tissue on the nail plate, not the living tissue that surrounds the nail plate. In the cross section shown in Figure 1-3, the cuticle can be seen separating from the underside of the eponychium. The underside of the eponychium is constantly shedding thin layers of this colorless tissue. As this shed skin emerges with the nail plate it creates one of the most important of the four nail plate guardian seals.

During a properly performed manicure, the eponychium is gently pushed back to expose the cuticle. The cuticle must be carefully removed. Improperly performed, this part of the manicure can cause problems for clients. For example, applying artificial nail products over this thin layer of skin will prevent proper adhesion, causing the artificial nail to separate and lift from the surface of the natural nail plate. Many hours of valuable time are lost to repairs made necessary by careless removal of the cuticle. Not only can improperly removing the cuticle contribute to artificial nail service breakdown, it can also lead to infection or nail deformities. This is why it is very important to avoid removing cuticle from underneath the nail fold. It is fine to push back the eponychium first, but do not place any instrument underneath the nail fold itself. This can lead to injury and infection ...
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#10
Yay! Just found this gem. Thanks Fingernailfixer!!


****
http://youtu.be/hZBZvjQhuFQ
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#11
This is when you hate to see someone like me walk in to your shop. My poor hands, I don't think anyone can be as hard on them as I am. Granted they have not been this bad in a long long time. But I flinch when I get a client that has skin like mine. It makes me sad that I can not touch them and they are healed. But as you can see biters do it to them self.

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"To put it bluntly, I seem to have a whole superstructure with no foundation. But I'm working on the foundation."
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#12
I'd totally take care of you. I'd give you a hot oil mani and a paraffin dip and I'd buff that dead skin off, not nip it. Then, I'd put you on a regular regimen of either solar oil or jojoba oil, rubbed into your hands and nails 3-4x a day, and then at night before you went to bed. : )
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#13
OHH You would rub my hands before bed! You are so sweet! Wink I really need to get my tips back on I leave them alone when my nails are done. I gave my self a hot oil mani last night and cleaned them up and I am off to put my nails "on" lol so in a week or so They will be better. I really should use solar oil all the time! I know better but still am lax.
"To put it bluntly, I seem to have a whole superstructure with no foundation. But I'm working on the foundation."
Marilyn Monroe
https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000798439789
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#14
I don't feel like you cuticle looks that bad, aside from the surrounding skin being sad, the cuticle itself is not very bulky and doesn't look like it need taken back befor it takes over. I guess I trim in cases where the cuticle is soooo thick that it's taking up nail space. I do it clean, it's dead, and I only take it back so it looks right, not to the point of bleeding and not as close as some might be imagining. Just enough to make it look right while keeping the seal intact. Then I would recommend cuticle remover and ask that you buff it with a towel to exfoliate that new area and keep it from over growing again. It takes time but it can be done. Now if we could just help you not mess with the cuticles so they look so sad.
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#15
(08-28-2011, 01:04 PM)erindoesnails Wrote: I'd totally take care of you. I'd give you a hot oil mani and a paraffin dip and I'd buff that dead skin off, not nip it. Then, I'd put you on a regular regimen of either solar oil or jojoba oil, rubbed into your hands and nails 3-4x a day, and then at night before you went to bed. : )


Hi,
I would like to know what you do in a case where someone cannot use oils on their fingers that often. I have 2 coworkers that work with magazines all day. They cannot have oils on their hands and it would ruin the work. One has STACKED cuticles. The other has hands that look a tad worse than the pic above. As a newbie I want to be able to work on their hands properly. One let me cut, the other didn't. The one that didn't did not look clean to me.
THanks.
NY Licensed Nail + Waxing Tech
Owner/Developer Suite Tee
http://www.Facebook.com/TashawnaH
Instagram: @SuiteTee
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#16
If they use jojoba oil on their way to work and on their way home, it soaks in completely in about 10 minutes, which is why I tell my clients to do it on the way to and from work. Their hands are busy driving and by the time they get there, it's all soaked in - no mess! Most people have at least a 10 minute drive to work. Because jojoba oil is so close to the bodies natural oil, once it's completely absorbed, it's not greasy. If that still interferes with their work, I'd suggest applying it on the way home from work and then once again before bed. That shouldn't cause any issues for them.
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#17
Nipping the cuticle is to risky for me. I educated my clients about putting oil daily around the cuticle.
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#18
I nip. I push generally from the middle of the nail to the eponychium without pushing the eponychium back. All of the thin, white film that is exposed afyer doing so is the cuticle. It's dead skin and there's no harm in cutting it off. Now, I have worked with clients and nail techs who think the whole ridge of skin is supposed to be cut. That is not true. I've had clients who no longer have a ridge of skin because it's been cut so much.
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#19
(04-21-2012, 03:34 AM)Sherrie90630 Wrote: If they use jojoba oil on their way to work and on their way home, it soaks in completely in about 10 minutes, which is why I tell my clients to do it on the way to and from work. Their hands are busy driving and by the time they get there, it's all soaked in - no mess! Most people have at least a 10 minute drive to work. Because jojoba oil is so close to the bodies natural oil, once it's completely absorbed, it's not greasy. If that still interferes with their work, I'd suggest applying it on the way home from work and then once again before bed. That shouldn't cause any issues for them.


I'll tell them. Thanks.
NY Licensed Nail + Waxing Tech
Owner/Developer Suite Tee
http://www.Facebook.com/TashawnaH
Instagram: @SuiteTee
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