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Nail lifting from nail bed after using cnd shellac
#1
I am a salon owner and nail technician. I've worn shellac
Faithfully for 8 months. 2 applications ago I noticed the free edge
Had changed down the side of two nails . Didn't think to much about it
Until I removed it again and noticed my nail has lifted from the nail bed.
It is about 1/3 of my nail. What could this be from?
I have cut all my nails down and started using a anti fungal treatment from
Opi, the nail is not colored, it just looks like free edge. Any thoughts?
I love gel polish, I'm a girly girl! I do have an active lifestyle. Mama of 4 young boys and salon owner. Any help would be appreciated. Do you think it could just be from driness that caused this? I have member been good about applying oil to my nails!
#2
There was a thread a few weeks ago about this very thing. Seems there's a few that ARE experiencing this but no one could give a reason why.

On my own personal experience I've noticed on the index of my right hand, the nail bed is further back and possibly caused by long term use of pure acetone to remove polish. I don't use Shellac so I can't speak for that product. That's the only thing in common with the problem I can think of.
#3
Also sensitivity to the product could cause your nails to lift.
Iina (that's a double 'i')
Health & beauty, fitness and nails!
http://www.facebook.com/jazznails
#4
Just weird how it happened so quickly.
I doubt an allergic reaction would take 8 months to develop.
Thank you for your reply!
#5
Possibly overexposure to the remover. What are your removal steps?
#6
I use acetone with cotton saturated in it. Then wrap each nail in foil for 10 minutes. Then use outage stuck to remove gel. Then file wash nails with soap. Then use creative cuticle gel use orange wood stick again and push back cuticle. Wash again. Then use scrub fresh. Thanks again for your ideas! So do toy think it could be a fungus? Or infection?
#7
This happend several months ago to my good friend and salon owner. We were Shellacking just fine until I soaked her off and I noticed that her own nails were lifting away from her nail bed. I contacted Doug, and he was nice enough to get back to me, but I felt I really didn't get a clear cut answer to why her own nails were lifting. So basically we discontinued the Shellac. She has never had a reaction to Gels, but she has very fair and has sensitive skin. I am thinking she just had a sensitivity reaction. I feel your pain! :roll:
Lee
Bella Capelli Salon

"Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old." Franz Kafka
#8
I just got done with a class on Shellac, and I asked the question because a girl at work (hairdresser) had it happen to her and we were all wondering why!?
she called it "onychofrkutfhuf" something I connot pronounce nor spell for that matter! haha But she said if your bulb in your lamp is not either strong enough wattage or you are not using the cnd lamp, then the UV rays are trying to hard to cure the product and are pulling (curing) the product away from the nail....which in return pulls the nail bed away as well! this happened to the Hair dresser after one Shellac application! She asked me why her nails were seperating, at the time another nail tech was trying out the product with the 2 handed IBD light, which was not strong enough to cure it!! I dont know if this is the real case, but It seems logical...haha
#9
there is another post on this exact same topic, there might be more info over on that one...but the word I was looking for was onycholysis! haha
#10
Wow. I am using a brisa lamp, however I did just replace the bulbs maybe a month ago. I will check the bulbs! To save a buck, I bought bulbs from a lighting company same watts but not brisa brand. I did notice last 2 times I used it seemed hot! Thank you so much for thinking of me and asking the question!! Xoxo to you nail girls! I feel better knowing its not a fungus thank you thank you!
#11
It would be very interesting to know if the others who're having the seperation problem are using lamps other than the one CND says to use. If that's the case, then I'd say the problem might have an answer.
#12
I am not using CND's lamp and am only using a lamp that has one bulb. Neither myself or my clients are having nail plate lifting with Shellac or any problems at all. Been using the product since last June.
#13
This is too weird! I was doing my co-workers nails today and noticed that 5 of her 10 nails are seperating off the bed near the nail grooves. She is also a nailtech, not a hairdresser. I have never used a sog polish on her. Back in August I switched her from acrylic to gel because she does pedis and the acrylic was melting. Then in March I started using 2 different brands of gel on each hand. It is happeneing on both hands. I have always used a 36 watt ( 4- 9 Watt bulb) uv lamp on her. I do suspect my bulbs need to be replaced. I'm waiting to pick some up at Premiere. I used her lamp today. She has new phillips brand bulbs in hers. She did not have this problem 2 weeks ago when I did her. I'm very concerned because one of her nails is lifted 1/3 of the way down. She also has seperation on her toes and has been wearing rockstar toes recently.
Robin Stopper Renner
Nails by Robin/R.S.Innovations, LLC.
Mount Dora, Florida
http://www.wrist-assist.com
[email protected]
#14
Since we all know individual chemistry is so different, then I think we can say that yes, Shellac may be the cause for this, or any other SOG Polish line. Just because it is not happening for one set of clients, does not mean that the gel polish is not the culprit for those it is happening with. If there is a tech who has never had this happen, well that doesn't mean that it isn't happening. I don't think product use, can be ruled out, when all fingers point to that service as the start of the lifted nail bed. Could be that the clients who experience this, just cannot wear Shellac. What about trying another brand?
#15
I would think that if the product is doing it on some and not others it isn't the product. It could be something else, right?? The only reason I posted my response was because someone wanted to know who was using what lamp and what bulbs. So by trouble shooting who is having issues, who is using what and how is how to determine what is causing the issue with facts, not just guessing. Shoot, it could be anything. Finding out what is the consistent issue for those having the problem and finding out what others are doing different who aren't having the problem is the answer IMO! And from what I can tell it isn't just Shellac. If that was the case, I'd have some clients with this issue and I don't.
#16
Cheryl, I know you are an avid Shellac user and I don't want you to take any of my replies personal in any way. As they are not really a direct remark of your thoughts, but just my participation. When I said I believe Shellac may in fact be the culprit for these clients, does not mean I am attacking the line you love. And I am very happy you have one that is awesome for your clients, whish is very important, but I fully believe that the chemistry of the person could be what these clients have in common and that Shellac is just not for them. It's nothing to do with Shellac being bad, it's just not for them. If I started using Shellac instead of Eco so quick, or acrylic, silk, gel or traditional polish, and the clients nails started to lift from the nail bed, I would be pointing at Shellac, since it's the only new service. I would then expirement with other ways, like buffing it down and replacing color, or switching lines, soaking off every other time and so on. If it were still an issue, I would conclude that Shellac is not for those customers and I would discontinue using it.
#17
sobeit :
> Cheryl, I know you are an avid Shellac user and I don't want you to take any
> of my replies personal in any way. As they are not really a direct remark of
> your thoughts, but just my participation. When I said I believe Shellac may
> in fact be the culprit for these clients, does not mean I am attacking the
> line you love. And I am very happy you have one that is awesome for your clients,
> whish is very important, but I fully believe that the chemistry of the person
> could be what these clients have in common and that Shellac is just not for
> them. It's nothing to do with Shellac being bad, it's just not for them. If
> I started using Shellac instead of Eco so quick, or acrylic, silk, gel or traditional
> polish, and the clients nails started to lift from the nail bed, I would be
> pointing at Shellac, since it's the only new service. I would then expirement
> with other ways, like buffing it down and replacing color, or switching lines,
> soaking off every other time and so on. If it were still an issue, I would
> conclude that Shellac is not for those customers and I would discontinue using
> it.

TY Peggy, but I didn't take what you said personally. I was just exlaining my last comment about what light I'm using and was hoping others would chime in, but I guess not. I just find it weird that it is happening to some and not to everyone. With all the people I've used it on there has not been one incident. Hopefully something will be resolved on this.

Has anyone contact CND. Holly, do you have anything to shed some light on this??
#18
I don't use sog, I use strictly hard gel and so far have had no seperation issues on fingers. I have had some on toes, tho. Until Robin said in an earlier post that a client had the seperation happen on toes, I truly hadn't thought it could be caused by the gel. Now, I'm wondering...

I use TEN and and a generic 4x9 lamp. This problem happened last year, so far none this year. I changed the bulbs later in the year after the sep. happened. Not sure what the brand is but not Sylvania.

What if we list what lamp and bulbs we're using? Cheryl says she's using a single bulb lamp and not having problems....anyone else using a single bulb lamp? Cheryl, what wattage is it? I use a tunnel.
#19
Good idea Donna. I have a 36 Watt P.N.I. lamp with the original bulbs that came with it. I suspect they need to be changed. I will be picking some up at Premiere this weekend.
Robin Stopper Renner
Nails by Robin/R.S.Innovations, LLC.
Mount Dora, Florida
http://www.wrist-assist.com
[email protected]
#20
Would climate be a common factor? Not sure where everyone is located as not all have it listed in there profile/signatures, but do know that CO is extremely dry. I thought I had dry skin when I lived in TN. When I moved to CO not only my skin was screaming for moisture but my furniture too!

Just a thought from a novice nail tech. :Confusedhrug::
Idea
Anna
#21
Donna, it's a 9w.
#22
@ Anna, I personally don't think it's climate or I'd see a lot more going on. We're really humid here pretty much year 'round.
#23
Interestingly, I've been answering nail techs questions about "onycholysis" (nail plate separation from the nail bed) for more than twenty years and I've noticed several things remain constant.

For one, no matter what product is being used, the product is almost always automatically blamed. If doesn't matter if its nail polish, artificial nails or even nail buffing oil, nail techs almost never consider it's something they are doing, yet as I discuss in my book, onycholysis is usually caused by improper nail preparation and/or improper product removal. Aggressive filing, e.g. incorrect use of e-files or use of course abrasives and/or a heavy hand are the most likely reasons.

Secondly, speedy and/or less-than-careful product removal is another leading cause. The bed epithelium is the tissue that holds the nail plate and nail bed together and it's easily damaged if proper care isn't taken. Faster isn't better when it comes to product removal. The client's nails are more important, so don't rush the removal process. Proper removal is just as important as proper application. Be gentle!

Of course, the third major reason must be that some clients are not good candidates for artificial nail coatings and can have such problems, e.g. some older clients.

So, the vast majority of the time onycholysis has nothing to do with what the client is wearing, but instead caused by physical trauma to the nail plate/nail bed junction where the bed epithelium holds the two together. This problem has nothing to do with the lamp that is being used, but if you're not using the correct lamp/bulbs with the correct product, then clients ARE more likely to have other problems, just probably not onycholysis.

It is also important to note that nail techs all too frequently don't have a proper understand the anatomy of the nail, so they can't properly troubleshoot when problems occur. Nail professionals need to be more serious about understand the nail and how if functions, as well as to know the proper terminology for the parts of the nail.

Improper nail prep and removal of coatings remain problems in our industry and this leads to a large percentage of the problems that client's experience. In fact, improper removal has become so prevalent, that I decided to dedicate the next Doug Schoon's Brain (Episode 10) to improper removal of nail coating products in general. Also, the causes of onycholysis are discussed in a previous episode. You can see the new episode #10 as well as all previous episodes when Doug Schoon's Brain opens again, June 11-21.
Doug Schoon
Chief Scientific Adviser
Creative Nail Design, Inc.
#24
I nominate this thread be made a 'sticky'!
Anna
#25
Nail Raising :
> I nominate this thread be made a 'sticky'!
I second that...
OK so now I am wondering why so many are asking about the onycholysis in relation to the start of gel polish services, vs, acrylic or gel enhancements, I ask only because some of my clients are rough with their own nails, and yet that never prompts the bed to lift away. I think clients can be way more careless with their nails, than the nail tech might be during the service. I suppose that's why I am one to look at the product, vs process.
I am not experiencing this issue, I am also not using Shellac regularly, but from the limited times I have used it, I feel like it's not that easy to remove, compared to another brand I use, and if it's not that easy, maybe techs are forced into prying it a bit more, to stay on time. Just thinking out loud.

 
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