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American run salon? Means what to you?
#26
How about using American Trained, licensed and insured? Im just brain storming. I do believe that the techs where clients have had bad experiences with non English speaking techs, are not all trained let alone trained in the U.S. Under strict regulations for safe procedures.
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#27
Yes, naturalized citizens can say the same thing, Native American's can say the same thing, saying your American Owned, etc. isn't exclusive to only one race, therefore it isn't racist to say you are IMO.

There are people who would regard saying you speak English as being a racist. And IMO it is more exclusive than saying American Owned, etc. I've asked many people a better way to word what I want to say and no one can come up with anything better, just like Donna has.

I have gotten a lot of flack from this board in the past for stating on my website that I am an American Owned nail salon. It is nice to be able to discuss it this time w/o receiving anomosity from people within our own industry.
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#28
sobeit :
> How about using American Trained, licensed and insured? Im just brain storming.
> I do believe that the techs where clients have had bad experiences with non
> English speaking techs, are not all trained let alone trained in the U.S. Under
> strict regulations for safe procedures.


Not sure I see that any different than saying American Owned, etc. Still using the word "american" which some seem to reference to being racist because of someone else's race. There is a Vietnamese school here, that only teaches Vietnamese, so they could say American trained, etc. Not sure that is what I'm looking for in wording, but it's a good try.
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#29
I think what happens when we read Amerian owned is a message that means, not an Asian salon. American trained to me means all people that received training with American regulated techniques. I think veitnamese techniques are a bit different and they were taught differently. Like the cutting of the entire cuticle, they do it because they were taught there is a reason behind it.
To say it's an English speaking salon, to me means nothing about race, but about who you can communicate with. If you were bilingual that would be an awesome thing to put on the ad.
I want us all to be able to talk about touchy topics so they are no longer a sore spot. But just a different view. I started out here years ago and I don't really like to be someone I am not. I argued my point to death because I was frustrated that people wanted me to think their way or be quiet. I now know that in turn that meant I wanted them to think my way. It's time for this forum members to speak their mind in a respectful way, but not be worried or intimidated to answer what they really feel. If everything goes under the rug, or gets sugar coated, then we aren't really talking. No minds get opened, no views get told, and we don't get to talk about deeper things that affect the industry.
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#30
my problem with adding more words is lack of space in the ad. Right now, "American Owned" seems to be getting that point across. If I say "English Speaking", that does no good because most of the Salons they DON'T want to go back to actually speak some English, just not well enough to be understood. One of the main complaints is that the client tells them what they want, the tech smiles, nods like they understand, then keeps right on doing what they're asked/told not to......so the client assumes the tech doesn't understand English well enough to know what was said.
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#31
I understand, so keep American owned/operated. I hope I didn't come across as saying it needs changed. You have a great explanation of what it says for you. That's what you clients are looking for so that's what it should be.
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#32
I don't think there is anything racist/wrong about saying your American Owned/Operated or American Trained. Being proud of your nationality can only be considered racist in America, I swear. When you go to many other countries being a native business is a positive aspect and being allowed to have a business as a non native is a privilege. Wasn't Ford proud of being and American Car company? Maybe if people took the pride in their/our businesses our country may be in a better place.
While we're going there. I'm only starting out however my goal is to own my own business and I plan on having African American Owned/Operated as part of my business and I don't find that racist nor wrong with promoting that. It just lets people know that I have been trained according to American regulations, I will be able to communicate fluently with you, and your money will benefit our struggling community.
NY Licensed Nail + Waxing Tech
Owner/Developer Suite Tee
http://www.Facebook.com/TashawnaH
Instagram: @SuiteTee
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#33
Just one difference for me when we are trying to compare retail companies with nail salons. The retail being American made means we are keeping our money working for the American economy and in turn the families that live here. The salons are not operating out of the country benefiting other economies, they are operating in America no matter who is working there, so American owned doesn't mean money staying in america is the benefit, since it cannot be outsourced. Just an observation from me.
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#34
sobeit :
> I understand, so keep American owned/operated. I hope I didn't come across
> as saying it needs changed. You have a great explanation of what it says for
> you. That's what you clients are looking for so that's what it should be.

I agree. You have to do what's right for your business. I understand why someone would add that for marketing purposes. I'm sure that being "American" has helped my business; I just don't want to imply an us vs them thing. I think that this will continue to be a sore subject in this industry. Look at the top two comments for this youtube video (smile line placement by cnd): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhJeYdzYUzw
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#35
Tashawna :
> I don't think there is anything racist/wrong about saying your American Owned/Operated
> or American Trained. Being proud of your nationality can only be considered
> racist in America, I swear. When you go to many other countries being a native
> business is a positive aspect and being allowed to have a business as a non
> native is a privilege. Wasn't Ford proud of being and American Car company?
> Maybe if people took the pride in their/our businesses our country may be
> in a better place.
> While we're going there. I'm only starting out however my goal is to own my
> own business and I plan on having African American Owned/Operated as part of
> my business and I don't find that racist nor wrong with promoting that. It
> just lets people know that I have been trained according to American regulations,
> I will be able to communicate fluently with you, and your money will benefit
> our struggling community.


Well said and I LIKE!!
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#36
sobeit :
> Just one difference for me when we are trying to compare retail companies with
> nail salons. The retail being American made means we are keeping our money
> working for the American economy and in turn the families that live here. The
> salons are not operating out of the country benefiting other economies, they
> are operating in America no matter who is working there, so American owned
> doesn't mean money staying in america is the benefit, since it cannot be outsourced.
> Just an observation from me.


Sorry to say this, but that is not always the case. The money doesn't always stay in America when people go to the other salons. There was an interesting article in one of the trade magazines about this subject recently.
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#37
idonls :

>
>
> Sorry to say this, but that is not always the case. The money doesn't always
> stay in America when people go to the other salons. There was an interesting
> article in one of the trade magazines about this subject recently.




I thing Peggy was speaking of 'product', i.e. retail = products ("Made in America") = money stays here, where as, salon = services ("American Owned), maybe owned by an American, yet still may be supporting a family elsewhere and $$ goes there.

Peggy, not speaking for you but this is how I took your statement in explaining how you see the differences in the two.

Cheryl, you are correct and would be true with any business.
Anna
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#38
Thank you for the help Anna, but what I meant was, if the salon is located in the USA, then the money has to be working for the US economy. The reason I say this is because the people working there live here, shop here, eat here, pay taxes here. ( even the state sales tax if anyone wants to argue that they don't pay federal taxes ). These workers and owners who are taking the money, are not sending it all home ( how do they live if thats true? ), and they are not flying over seas every night to spend the currency in another country. So they money they make, if not all of it, is working here.
American salons are just as capable of sending money to family or friends in other countries. Its not a citizen vs illegal practice.
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#39
Owners/workers whose families have been born and raised in America for generations aren't likely to send money overseas. Whereas those who have just moved here are. Just depends on how you want to perceive things.

All I do know is that I am proud to be American and proud to say my shop is owned by such. It has brought me business, just as it has for Donna. And until someone comes up with a more politically correct way if saying it, it's staying that way.
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#40
I never ever asked you to change it. I'm done discussing this the way it is now. It has nothing to do with the perception of the words American Owned. It's now going into a debate on where else you think the money is going. And I don't want to talk political views on economics or the rights people have to spend their money and where.
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#41
wooshka :
> Here is Australia we have had shops of all sorts put up signs saying "australian
> owned/operated" for as long as I can remember.
>
> Here I see it as meaning it is owned and or operated by Aussies as we are in
> Australia.
>
> I don't see it as offensive at all, I see it as promoting that your business
> supports the country that the business is based in. It's promoting keeping
> the money that it earns here in Australia also.
>
> I really think this racist card is getting taken to far sometimes and I know
> here anyway, people are using it to advantage themselves and they are the ones
> that call others racist?!?!?!
>
> I would see no problem if I saw a sign saying Italian owned, or PNG owned and
> see no problems with American owned at all.

I just want to confirm, when I said "I really think this racist card is getting taken to far sometimes and I know here anyway..........."

I didn't mean here as in BT, I meant here in Australia....I just wanted to clarify that cause I re-read back through my post just now and could see that my comment could be taken that I was meaning people here in BT.

I have given this subject more thought since I posted and since reading everyone's posts since mine and I think there is no right or wrong regarding this subject. At the end of the day we all interpret it differently and no one has the right to say their opinion is the right one or some elses is the wrong one, we just all see the meaning of "American owned" differently and people use it for different meanings and if it is improving your business and sending a message that you wish your client base to hear and it's working for your business, then that's fine, no one has the right to say it's wrong.

From my own experience here in Australia, it has been a positive thing when businesses have the "Australian owned/operated" sign up, so each to their own I supposeSmile
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#42
What about fluent in English? That isn't offensive to anyone I would think.
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#43
"Fluent in English" might work, but I still like "American Owned". There are some Asian salons that do have techs working there that speak good English. For the most part, the people who come to me because of those two words have tried literally all of the Asian run salons in my town and don't like to hear the techs talking amongst themselves in their lanquage. Call it insecurity, paranoia, whatever, but they don't like it! I've had Mexican Americans who've commented they didn't want to go in there because of the lanquage issue. They believe the way English speaking Americans do, it's rude to speak another lanquage in front of someone who doesn't speak it! That's just something we're brought up with, and obviously some cultures don't believe that way. Too bad for them but great for me, because it's making more money for me.
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#44
Wooshka, your such a sweetheart, I don't think anyone thought you were saying they were racist.
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#45
Wooshka I never took anything you said badly. I thought we were having a discussion, which is what was originally discussed and encouraged to do. I brought up different ways of looking at things. And it is a matter of perspective and how you see things. That is what makes us human. If we all saw everything the same way there wouldn't even be this board to discuss things on.

Please quit reading into my comments what ISN'T there. Thank you!
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#46
Quote:idonls :
Owners/workers whose families have been born and raised in America for generations
aren't likely to send money overseas. Whereas those who have just moved here are. Just depends on how you want to perceive things.

All I do know is that I am proud to be American and proud to say my shop is owned by such. It has brought me business, just as it has for Donna. And until someone comes up with a more politically correct way if saying it, it's staying that way.

Please quit reading into my comments what ISN'T there. Thank you!


I'm not adding anything that's not there. I feel like these statements are off track of the meaning. And the second implies you were asked to change it. I'm not sure how or what else it means saying they send money away. I guess for me that's not the topic. It veers off to a completely different vibe.
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#47
Quote:Here is Australia we have had shops of all sorts put up signs saying "australian owned/operated" for as long as I can remember.

Here I see it as meaning it is owned and or operated by Aussies as we are in Australia.

I don't see it as offensive at all, I see it as promoting that your business supports the country that the business is based in. It's promoting keeping the money that it earns here in Australia also.

I really think this racist card is getting taken to far sometimes and I know here anyway, people are using it to advantage themselves and they are the ones that call others racist?!?!?!

I would see no problem if I saw a sign saying Italian owned, or PNG owned and see no problems with American owned at all.


As a fellow Australian, I agree that saying your business is Australian owned is commonplace. Some businesses say which State. In terms of ethnic communities, some signs stating, for example, "Italian operated" are relevant when referring to services to the Italian community. As someone who has lived in a highly populated non English speaking area in Sydney, some shops have stated "English and Arabic spoken here" as some businesses do not have staff that speak English. The signage is not in English either.

So I take ‘American run’ to mean just that – run by Americans. Some countries allow foreign ownership of businesses and want to be identified as such or they want to target a particular sector of the community. It doesn't mean they won't serve anyone else.

While I can understand why some people would feel put out by someone speaking another language in front of them, there's a quick response to that: ask them not to. That's more of an ettiquette issue than an ethnic one.

So I’m flummoxed as to why this has become a race issue for some.
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#48
Toothypeg, I'm in total agreement with what you said.

Peggy, I didn't bring up about the money staying in America, you did. That didn't even enter my mind. So the direction wasn't changed by me. I merely responded to what you said.
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#49
To ask them to stop speaking their lanquage in front of us would be rude in our eyes. The general opinion is they should KNOW it's rude to speak in a way that we don't understand, though I'm not sure how they would know that if someone hasn't told them. It's on the person/people who choose to live in this country to understand our customs. In America, we believe in truth in advertising, it seems some nail salons DON'T believe in that. To incorrectly label things to make it seem it's what it's not is just not DONE with an American run business.....case in point, "solar nails", or calling acrylic nails with a tackless top coat of gel, "gel nails", saying "gel is old fashioned and acrylic is better for you, is another".

I take that as these salons think we're stupid, because we TRUST the salon to be honest with us and not mislabel something soooo, because of this trust, we're easily mislead. It seems they count on our trusting nature so it's used against us.
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#50
Quote:Donna in Huntsville, TX. :
> To ask them to stop speaking their lanquage in front of us would be rude in
> our eyes. The general opinion is they should KNOW it's rude to speak in a
> way that we don't understand, though I'm not sure how they would know that
> if someone hasn't told them. It's on the person/people who choose to live
> in this country to understand our customs. In America, we believe in truth
> in advertising, it seems some nail salons DON'T believe in that. To incorrectly
> label things to make it seem it's what it's not is just not DONE with an American
> run business.....case in point, "solar nails", or calling acrylic nails with
> a tackless top coat of gel, "gel nails", saying "gel is old fashioned and acrylic
> is better for you, is another".
>
> I take that as these salons think we're stupid, because we TRUST the salon
> to be honest with us and not mislabel something soooo, because of this trust,
> we're easily mislead. It seems they count on our trusting nature so it's
> used against us.
Whats really sad is that such a huge percent of consumers visit the type of salon that lies about procedure and product and lies about what they will do for your nail or to your nail. Then the consumer thinks we are all practicing this same type of work and they don't want to go to any salon.
I can see the draw to American owned for the consumer because they will view the salon as different from their last experience. But even American nail techs can perform sub par.
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