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How to choose the best led lamp? Suggestions????
#1
Im having hard time choosing the best led lamp, suggestionsss???
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#2
I bought the Star Duo Lamp in hopes I could kill two birds with one stone. However, that was not the case Sad It has major shadows when using the LED part of the lamp and I ended up with half cured nails. I checked hand placement of my clients, which was suggested by the owners manual for troubleshooting, and still half cured nails. The UV bulbs create such a shadow that the LED part is pretty much worthless. I do use this lamp as my UV lamp, which it is great for!
I purchased the OPI LED lamp for the small footprint it has on my table. It has multiple timers on the top and it is automated. Once a client positions their hand correctly, it turns on automatically. I have cured OPI (of course), Gelish and LeChat Perfect Match LED polish with the OPI lamp with no problems. Needless to say, I love my OPI LED lamp Smile
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#3
What products are you going to use?
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#4
I'm open to trying out different brands, so I'm choosing a led lamp that is suitable to more brands. Thanks, Pka!
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#5
I have the Artistic Pro 30. It's a 5 finger cure LED lamp. The way the bulbs are positioned inside allow the thumbs and fingers to cure evenly. I use ibd, Gelish and Orly Gel FX soak off gel polishes with this lamp.

Chrissy
http://www.lovethosetoes.com
Bowie, MD
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#6
For the most popular ones so far with LED Lamps, I would have to say OPI, Gelish and Essie would have to be the best. I tried all of these and ended up with the OPI one.

Opi had power adapter issues, it was mainly because of the power brick being mistreated. but as long as you carefully plug in and out then you are okay. Besides the power adapter, it is a flawless machine. It is made out of metal so it can fall off the table okay. This lamp is a little heavy but it has a lot of quality. Design is spaceship like.

Gelish 18G and etc, are all made out of plastic. My only downside with these machines is that they are made out of plastic and they tend to be a bit to small for people with big hands. Other than that, I like the way it looks. I did have a machine a while back where smoke came out of it. It still worked, I had to hit the secret reset button all the time for it to start. I stopped using it because I'm a little scared of the smoke .Artistic, their sister brand, also have a lamp too, it is a bit bigger than the Gelish one and its quite good.

Essie light is also made out of plastic but it is big enough for a lot of clients. Not to bad for a $250 machine.

That being said, I ended up with the OPI LED Lamp and plus it is on sale at a couple places right now, price ranges from $180-250.
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#7
Anyone else having any negative on the Star duo lamp? I just bought two on sale... ;0/
Thanks..........
To make the best nails is to do the best you can!!
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#8
Star Nail is a great company that sells product over the years since the 70's and 80's. Mr. Cuccio, the owner, really knows the industry well. The Star LED Lamp is a very convenient lamp because of both LED and UV compatible. My only downside is that, usually multifunction machines have problems after a while. This product is made in china but the thing with star is that you get a whole lotta bang out of the buck. The stuff is cheap, but it should last you quite some time.

If you want something that would last you a long time then I would go with the major brands.

(01-23-2014, 12:07 AM)nailsbytheresa Wrote: Anyone else having any negative on the Star duo lamp? I just bought two on sale... ;0/
Thanks..........


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#9
Thanks lilsquirrel428..... ;0)
To make the best nails is to do the best you can!!
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#10
The Industry Source has the OPI Led lamp on sale I believe 119.00 but you have to buy 6 OPI gel polish. I have 2 and love it

Opi mailed me a new cord free of charge
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#11
(01-22-2014, 11:52 AM)PKA357 Wrote: I bought the Star Duo Lamp in hopes I could kill two birds with one stone. However, that was not the case Sad It has major shadows when using the LED part of the lamp and I ended up with half cured nails. I checked hand placement of my clients, which was suggested by the owners manual for troubleshooting, and still half cured nails. The UV bulbs create such a shadow that the LED part is pretty much worthless. I do use this lamp as my UV lamp, which it is great for!
I purchased the OPI LED lamp for the small footprint it has on my table. It has multiple timers on the top and it is automated. Once a client positions their hand correctly, it turns on automatically. I have cured OPI (of course), Gelish and LeChat Perfect Match LED polish with the OPI lamp with no problems. Needless to say, I love my OPI LED lamp Smile


I ended up doing the exact same thing!! the OPI LED lamp is amazeballs though. Cures EVERYTHING LED!
(01-26-2014, 01:47 PM)sbwalnuss Wrote:
(01-22-2014, 11:52 AM)PKA357 Wrote: I bought the Star Duo Lamp in hopes I could kill two birds with one stone. However, that was not the case Sad It has major shadows when using the LED part of the lamp and I ended up with half cured nails. I checked hand placement of my clients, which was suggested by the owners manual for troubleshooting, and still half cured nails. The UV bulbs create such a shadow that the LED part is pretty much worthless. I do use this lamp as my UV lamp, which it is great for!
I purchased the OPI LED lamp for the small footprint it has on my table. It has multiple timers on the top and it is automated. Once a client positions their hand correctly, it turns on automatically. I have cured OPI (of course), Gelish and LeChat Perfect Match LED polish with the OPI lamp with no problems. Needless to say, I love my OPI LED lamp Smile

the OPI LED lamp is on sale at cosmoprof next month too

I ended up doing the exact same thing!! the OPI LED lamp is amazeballs though. Cures EVERYTHING LED!


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#12
The most important thing to keep in mind is that the LED lights have a Very Narrow spectrum of light, so they are all designed specifically to cure the products that the company has tested & markets with them. It can cause over exposure issues over time, if you are not using the appropriate light for the product you are using. It may Seem like it is properly cured, but it is a Very risky practice to use one LED light for many different product lines. This is technology that every company is still working on and learning more about.
My suggestion is to choose a line and speak with the company about What LED light is best to use with that line. The company you choose should be able to tell you which lights have been tested to work with their line. I know that at Light Elegance, Jim is always testing other lights with our product line and while we love our UV light and would love for everyone to use it, we understand that some already have other lights when they discover our fabulous gels. Jim is always testing many lights and testing the cured products to make sure that we are all informed on what UV lights are safe for use with our products. He is also working on the LED light technology too. You can always call LE to get answers about many lights as well as products.
Best wishes on much success.
Darcy
Light Elegance Educator
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#13
I agree on the Artisitic Pro 30. I just got mine last week and its amazing. Very small and compact but cures all 5 fingers very well.
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#14
this is the first time i see someone admitting that they test other lamps if they cure their products and iam really glad i fould this thread.let me ask you a question then.how can we be sure as nail technicians that the products are fully cured?i have been asking on doug schoons fb page about that but i didn't get a straight answer.when technical data for both lamps and gels are missing it is not very easy to find out all the above.
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#15
Well there are several ways to test if a UV lamp is curing gel, but all of these require specialised equipment. For example, you could cure a gel sample of known width, length and thickness and then use an instrument to pull it apart until it breaks.

The problem is that unless you have a scientific or engineering education, it would be very difficult for anyone to understand the technical data for both the UV lamps and gels. This is much more complex than many people realise. Even if you had this data, all it would tell you is that a specific light source (CFL, LED, CCFL) has the capability to cure gel X. But it says nothing about the actual UV lamp design, for example the distance from light source to nails, quality of reflectors, or as someone mentioned in another post, shadowing caused by one light source (CFL tubes) blocking light from another light source (in this case LEDs).

What could be technically possible, is to rate gels and rate UV lamps in some kind of table. Give each colour dots depending on if they are compatible or not so people can match a UV lamp from a variety of manufacturers to the gel they use.

But commercially this is a non-starter. What's in it for the companies to take on this extra work? Will the companies that produce the gels (both actual manufacturers and factories that supply private labellers) want to give up this information? What demand is there really from the market for this when until now no-one has asked for this?

The reality is that some nail techs will take the manufacturers advice and buy the recommended UV lamp because they understand that it's a wiser business decision in the long run, same as most people would prefer their auto dealer to use replacement parts from the original manufacturer, rather than save a few bucks on a 3rd party part which may degrade the safety or reliability of their car.

Other nail techs (the majority) will buy whatever UV lamp, because of price, aesthetics, simply out of ignorance to the real facts or because they want to ignore any advice a manufacturer gives because they think they are trying to rip them off.

From my experience, Doug always gives a straight answer but some people refuse to accept the advice he gives - which is given freely and without any commercial benefit to himself. What he can't do is to give in a public forum data that is the intellectual property of his former employer - which some people on a recent Facebook discussion were unable to understand or appreciate.

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#16
some technicians do have more knowledge or people that can actually ask and get help on all of their inquiries regarding technical matters .I would be very pleased if companies would start including technical data with all the other info that come for the products and lamps.I agree in many things you mention but i must say that some of us have in mind that companies overcost their products.i follow a complete system but i still have problems with some colours like all the other technicians.if my lamp was appropriate for all the products from the same company like they say they are i wouldn't have that problem right?i have talked with many specialists and what they said to me is that led lamps do not cost more that 60 euro.how come companies charge them the triple?i understand that they must have a profit but that much in my opinion.
Last but not least is something you mentioned about how you can see if a gel is cured and its by testing its hardness did i understood well? if so why Doug Schoon says that hardness is not a way to see if a gel is cured?could you explain it to me please?thank you for your time answering this.
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#17
You know we have all had salon customers who think it's easy to produce a set of nails. They think that because they don't know what we know. It's like that with this technical data. It requires a chemist to understand and even then unless they have experience or producing UV cured products, they would not fully appreciate the complexity until they tried to produce a gel.

If you were to take 10 different UV lamps and test them by curing one particular gel, and had the equipment to see if the gel was fully cured, you would find that each UV lamp performed differently. So even though these UV lamp manufacturers can buy the same UV bulbs, CCFL or LED's, the performance of their product is very much affected by other aspects of the design.

If a NT is having problems to cure specific colours then either they are using a UV lamp that is not recommended by the manufacturer, or the supplier they have chosen has not tested their own products, or are willing to sell products that are substandard.

A great many "manufacturers" are actually private labellers, many of which buy identical products from the same factories. They don't need to employ a chemist and few employ an NT who is technically competent to test products. They are marketing companies and some are very good at that, customer service and logistics. Many of these companies will try to sell you an "all-purpose" UV lamp that promises to cure all gels. But you should ask yourself how this can be possible when they know nothing about the technical curing requirements of gels from other manufacturers.

A factor that can influence the UV lamp price is how many you manufacture - making more obviously reduces unit cost. If you are a major nail product manufacturer, perhaps it's possible to sell 10,000 UV lamps a year worldwide to your gel customers. A Chinese factory on the other hand, will try to sell a specific design of UV lamp to NT who use any type of gel, so perhaps they expect to sell 200,000 of that design per year, perhaps many more - so their manufacturing cost and ultimately resell price will be lower.

Another way that a Chinese factory can reduce costs is to sell products that have not been CE Mark tested or have the RoHS certificate. Both of these are required by law for any electrical product sold in Europe, but it's expensive to do and so the majority of Chinese factories don't do it knowing that lots of small and medium size nail product "manufacturers" are ignorant of the law, or don't care and will sell the products anyway.

If you are a nail product manufacturer, the majority of your income will come from monthly repeat sales of the gels, acrylics, gel polishes etc. How often do NT replace their UV lamps - every three years? So a manufacturers focus will be to keep you as a customer and to keep you buying every month - that's where the main profit lies. For my company and other manufacturers, we sell UV lamps because we have to so that our gel customers get the best possible experience of our products. UV lamps do occasionally fail and when that happens you lose the majority of the profit you made by providing a free replacement UV lamp with free shipping, dealing with the broken item, and making new paperwork. Also, the price a manufacturer can set for their UV lamp is restricted by what other manufacturers charge.

The difference between buying a manufacturers UV lamp and a a cheap UV lamp, to use your own example, is perhaps $120. Let's increase that to $200 for the sake of argument. The UV lamp will probably work for three years, so the extra cost to your company of buying a recommended UV lamp is = 200 / 36 months = $5.55 per month - which in any case you can get a tax write off against profits. This is a really small amount of money to worry about! How much money is spent on a mobile phone calls that are not entirely necessary, gel polish or nail polish colours that are not used, or nail art products when many customers don't want to pay a realistic price for that extra time? But if the NT develops their skills so their increased speed means they can fit in one extra customer per day that can generate hundreds of extra Dollars each month.

There are some areas in a business where it is sensible to save money. But there are other purchases which are essential to you delivering a good service, making money and maintaining your reputation. Buying the best professional materials and tools, is one part of being professional - which is what customers expect from us.

With regard to testing gels for curing. As I said there are different methods. Quite possibly other chemists may prefer different methods or use a combination of methods to increase the accuracy of their measurements. It's not unusual for scientists to disagree on the best method to use in any situation. :-)







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#18
Thank you Darcey and Bob, very informative and definitely helpful!
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#19
I have used Gelish 18G and Artistic Pro, mostly with Gelish hard gel, gelish whole line pretty much and with artistic gloss. I have at times not to to often used a shellac or OPI color in my Gelish LED lamp with out any issues, even on a 4 week fill in client. I have had my Gelish LED lamp now for 4 years still going strong with no problems!
Indiana fully Licensed Nail Tech.
Owner of Lila Nail Spa Heart
http://www.facebook.com/lilanailspa
http://www.facebook.com/nailsandyourheal...sbycrystal
Instagram: @essentials4health

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