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has anyone taken the ANT course from MediNail
#1
I am wondering if this course is worth the money ($279), if anyone has taken it & can say - I'm interested in learning about dealing with problem feet to some degree ... I have a service on my menu that I call 'foot therapy' - which is basically a no frills pedicure ...I am getting a lot of elderly folks who can't cut their own toenails ...with feet that have been neglected for ages ...many of these are diabetic & I'm afraid to work on them ...very thick toenails - most likely fungus infected ...the whole thing scares me yet I find myself wanting the help these folks.
I have read that diabetics should not soak their feet, or have their feet scrubbed ... I am seeing toenails that are so thick I wouldn't begin to know how to trim them ...I have recommended to a couple people, that they see a Dr because their feet looked so bad - my 'foot therapy' is not a replacement for medical attention as some of them seem to think - or they don't realize how bad their feet are and think they just need their toenails trimmed ... and then I'm scared to death of getting fungus in my shop - I sanitize/sterilize but I don't have an autoclave and really didn't want to spend that kind of money. I do think there is a tremdous need for an affordable foot care service for these people but I don't want to cause them any harm, spread any infections ...or get sued!
the best things in life, aren't things ...
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#2
Oh Loribe -- I'm new & the entire thick nail cutting is baffling me I just file. I'm in a salon that I'm (thank goodness) leaving soon & they just work on everyone.
I have no idea about that class- good luck!

Fyi-- INGROWN TOE NAILS -- do you "dig" or address this?
My school (grad in April) SPECIFIC ALLY told us its not on our license to "dig" out & we will not be protected if it comes back to haunt us. I was asked at my current job to" work on" a client with ingrown toenail & I couldn't & had to watch another tech do it-- OMG THE GUY WAS in soooo much pain! After 5 attempts he made her stop- I was ready to pass out.... lol. They said if he goes to podiatrists they will wreck his nail-- omg like what she did was OK??

DOES everyone work on ingrown toenails?

Thx
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#3
(09-11-2013, 12:31 PM)[email protected] Wrote: Fyi-- INGROWN TOE NAILS -- do you "dig" or address this?
My school (grad in April) SPECIFIC ALLY told us its not on our license to "dig" out & we will not be protected if it comes back to haunt us. I was asked at my current job to "work on" a client with ingrown toenail & I couldn't & had to watch another tech do it...


I have not had any ingrowns yet ...and I agree, it's not on my license to 'fix' that - I'd send them off to a Doctor!
the best things in life, aren't things ...
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#4
Are you planning on working for a Podiatrist? I have the full certification. If you would like to ask questions I would be more than glad to answer.
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#5
Thanks for your offer SS – I don't plan on working at a Podiatrist's office – I have my own little shop that does well enough & is growing, I really would just like to capitalize on this need that I see & be able to offer an affordable service to those who tend to neglect themselves because of the high cost. But in doing so I don't want to set myself up for a lawsuit. I'll email you then; thanks!
the best things in life, aren't things ...
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#6
(09-11-2013, 12:20 PM)loribe Wrote: I am wondering if this course is worth the money ($279), if anyone has taken it & can say - I'm interested in learning about dealing with problem feet to some degree ... I have a service on my menu that I call 'foot therapy' - which is basically a no frills pedicure ...I am getting a lot of elderly folks who can't cut their own toenails ...with feet that have been neglected for ages ...many of these are diabetic & I'm afraid to work on them ...very thick toenails - most likely fungus infected ...the whole thing scares me yet I find myself wanting the help these folks.
I have read that diabetics should not soak their feet, or have their feet scrubbed ... I am seeing toenails that are so thick I wouldn't begin to know how to trim them ...I have recommended to a couple people, that they see a Dr because their feet looked so bad - my 'foot therapy' is not a replacement for medical attention as some of them seem to think - or they don't realize how bad their feet are and think they just need their toenails trimmed ... and then I'm scared to death of getting fungus in my shop - I sanitize/sterilize but I don't have an autoclave and really didn't want to spend that kind of money. I do think there is a tremdous need for an affordable foot care service for these people but I don't want to cause them any harm, spread any infections ...or get sued!



I am one of the authors of the ANT so I can give you a list of benefits the graduates have given ME.
1) you learn how to work safely on chronically ill clients. The CDC now says 1 out of every 2 Americans have a chronic illness. Now, yes, many of them are not at-risk if you touch their feet, but ANT-Cs know which ones are at-risk and how to work safely with them.
2) the ANT-C has a certificate that says you are better than that budget salon tech down the street and your clients will KNOW you are. The ANT-C shows you how to let people KNOW you are better and that your services are worth the prices they pay
3) it will change your viewpoint on performing these services. Every graduate has said it did that and much more. (Except one who knew everything already, if you know what I mean.)
4) It trains the technicians in HOW to attract referrals from physicians and podiatrists.
5) the ANT course is specifically designed for salon-based nail technicians to prepare them (and their salon) for performing safe services on patients physicians and podiatrists refer.
6) an entire module trains how to market a safe salon, what they are, and how to attract clients who care about their safety

Now, ladies, don't get your back up and say I am telling you that your salon is not safe, etc. I am not saying that and you may very well have a safe salon. But confirming you are and following safe practices in your salon with targeted knowledge will greatly enhance your success if you know how to market it. These clients will NEVER leave you because they trust their feet to you unquestionably.

JanMc
Live and Learn - life is too short to stay the same
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