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Poll: Working full time / If I were to work full time I/ I would earn in profits...
$0-$30,000
$30,000-$40,000
$40,000-$50,000
$50,000-$60,000
$60,000-$70,000
$70,000-$80,000
$80,000-$90,000
$90,000-$100,000
<$100,000
 
 
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Earning potential of a self employed nail tech?
#1
I became very interested in nails when shellac came out and am exploring the possibility of becoming a self-employed nail technician. Part of my exploration is having an idea of my earning potential. I like to start with the end in mind and I want to know how much a successful full-time nail technician (because that's what I want to be!!) can earn in profits.

I don't plan on competing price wise with lower and middle end salons because the price wars can be brutal and there are way too many around in my area. I want to offer quality and luxurious treatments.

Again, I know that reaching my earning potential will take a long long time, experience, education, and many many other things, but I want to have a general idea so I know if this is something I can really pursue.

Also, I wanted to have a general idea of how much people are currently earning in this industry, but want to respect people's privacy and have included an anonymous poll.

I would be very grateful for your contributions on a rather taboo topic!!

Thank you!

PS: I meant >$100,000 on the poll...I don't know how to edit it.
 Reply
#2
I cant vote.
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 Reply
#3
(06-20-2013, 04:38 PM)sachi Wrote: I cant vote.
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HMMM....that's weird...I'm not too familiar with beautytech as I'm a new user....any one have any suggestions on how to fix that? anyone else getting the same msg?
 Reply
#4
The poll will prove nothing without knowing all the specifics. How can one determine profit without knowing income or expenses? What is the market willing to pay for your services?

Let's go High End, $75/fill and it takes you an hour and you are averaging 8 clients a day 5 days a week, 50 weeks a year. $75 X 8 X 5 X 50 = $150,000. Now deduct all of your expenses, Rent, nail supplies, coffee, toilet paper, bus license etc.

First of all you need a FULL BOOK before you can start raising prices. Whether you like it or not you WILL have to price your services at what the market is used to paying, not what you think you are worth, in the beginning.

I would venture to guess that less than 1% of all nail technicians in Canada or the US charge $75 or more for a fill and most of them have been in the business 20+ years. I have no data to back this up but I have called around and looked at service menus and the highest price I found was $75 but the average was $45 in my area.

If you are a "natural" it will still take you a year or two to have a full book unless the competition in your area is so bad that word of mouth spreads that you are the best.

Hope this helps a little.
 Reply
#5
A successful nail technician does a lot more than Shellac . . . in fact, I don't use any SOGP at all.
Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
 Reply
#6
(06-20-2013, 05:44 PM)gelpro Wrote: The poll will prove nothing without knowing all the specifics. How can one determine profit without knowing income or expenses? What is the market willing to pay for your services?

Let's go High End, $75/fill and it takes you an hour and you are averaging 8 clients a day 5 days a week, 50 weeks a year. $75 X 8 X 5 X 50 = $150,000. Now deduct all of your expenses, Rent, nail supplies, coffee, toilet paper, bus license etc.

First of all you need a FULL BOOK before you can start raising prices. Whether you like it or not you WILL have to price your services at what the market is used to paying, not what you think you are worth, in the beginning.

I would venture to guess that less than 1% of all nail technicians in Canada or the US charge $75 or more for a fill and most of them have been in the business 20+ years. I have no data to back this up but I have called around and looked at service menus and the highest price I found was $75 but the average was $45 in my area.

If you are a "natural" it will still take you a year or two to have a full book unless the competition in your area is so bad that word of mouth spreads that you are the best.

Hope this helps a little.


Thank you so much for taking the time to respond! Yes it definitely does help. With the poll I was just trying to get a general idea of what people are currently making in the field. I feel like it's very hard to find numbers since, understandably, people don't advertise their salaries.

I definitely don't expect to be making 150K in the beginning or anywhere near that. I'm not that naïve!! But if I'm going to spend my sweat, blood, and tears in this business, for me it's important that the potential is there. I'm looking for that thing where I can do what I love AND make money.

I was thinking it would be closer to 3 years before I was fully booked. Has 1-2 yrs been your experience?
(06-20-2013, 11:38 PM)PrecisionNails Wrote: A successful nail technician does a lot more than Shellac . . . in fact, I don't use any SOGP at all.


I completely agree that to be successful at nails you have to be able to do more to adapt to your clients. Shellac is simply what sparked my initial interest, though I plan on offering a lot more Smile

Are you mobile? home salon? traditional salon?
 Reply
#7
Nail salon ("mobile" is illegal in California); it's possible to be fully booked within a few months, as it's possible to never achieve that, no matter how many years later.

There are so many factors that determine success/failure, that it's unlikely that any one nail professional will make $100k,

Check this out;
http://www.nwstylist.com/columns/2012/06...nsion.html

Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
 Reply
#8
You can be the best manicurist in the world, but if you do not have other key skills, you will not be successful. You need to know about (and practice!) networking, sales, marketing, and accounting. And that is even if you work for someone else, since you are still the one who is literally hands-on with the clients. You also need to be willing to make some sacrifices - both financial and personal.

Working in sales and marketing for a long time, I can't tell you how many times I had sales folks who whined about people not buying because of the economy, or competitors, or because the top reps got all of the "good customers" - but I knew the top reps were constantly networking, constantly learning, constantly making themselves better and doing well in spite of the "downturn in the market". It's the same thing in any profession. Deborah Lippman is actually an awesome example of how you can succeed (read her story sometime) - but she is by far the exception to the rule.

To make a long story short - yes, you can make $100K a year as a manicurist, but the odds of that happening are very slim. The reality is the average nail tech makes less than 30K per year. Wanting something is not enough. You need a well thought out plan, the means, and the moxie to make it happen. And above all, you need to be honest with yourself on whether you have all of those things.
 Reply
#9
(06-21-2013, 12:01 PM)PrecisionNails Wrote: Nail salon ("mobile" is illegal in California); it's possible to be fully booked within a few months, as it's possible to never achieve that, no matter how many years later.

There are so many factors that determine success/failure, that it's unlikely that any one nail professional will make $100k,

Check this out;
http://www.nwstylist.com/columns/2012/06...nsion.html


Thank you Jaime for replying! The insight and honesty of your article was great and I appreciate a no-sugar coated response. I am however, confident in my ability to run a salon and have a pretty good idea of what it takes. We have many business owners in the family...some failed while others have been in business for decades. My question is really if nails have the potential to be a profitable industry otherwise I would rather invest my time, education, and energy in another passion. From what I've gathered and researched, very few nail techs are able to make a good living off their wage and those that have their own businesses aren't able to take home a profit even after years, but I don't know if this is because they aren't business savvy or because you can't make a lot of money doing nails.

PS: I loved your webpage! It's simply but elegant and the colors give off a calm vibe. More nail professionals should have webpages! And I think it's great that it's so easy to book an appointment with you.
 Reply
#10
Thanks for your kind words. Do yourself a favor and try to attend the Premiere Beauty Classic Show in Columbus, Ohio the weekend of October 6-7. It certainly doesn't have the largest exhibit floor (plan for Premiere Orlando, next June), but it will have a full schedule of hour-long nail and business classes.

http://www.beautyclassicshow.biz/shows/c...index.html
Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
 Reply
#11
(06-21-2013, 01:11 PM)plumgirl Wrote: You can be the best manicurist in the world, but if you do not have other key skills, you will not be successful. You need to know about (and practice!) networking, sales, marketing, and accounting. And that is even if you work for someone else, since you are still the one who is literally hands-on with the clients. You also need to be willing to make some sacrifices - both financial and personal.

Working in sales and marketing for a long time, I can't tell you how many times I had sales folks who whined about people not buying because of the economy, or competitors, or because the top reps got all of the "good customers" - but I knew the top reps were constantly networking, constantly learning, constantly making themselves better and doing well in spite of the "downturn in the market". It's the same thing in any profession. Deborah Lippman is actually an awesome example of how you can succeed (read her story sometime) - but she is by far the exception to the rule.

To make a long story short - yes, you can make $100K a year as a manicurist, but the odds of that happening are very slim. The reality is the average nail tech makes less than 30K per year. Wanting something is not enough. You need a well thought out plan, the means, and the moxie to make it happen. And above all, you need to be honest with yourself on whether you have all of those things.


Thanks for your insightful input and I wholeheartedly agree!! As precisionnails stated, some people go open their salon thinking there's nothing to it only to be sorely disappointed. A lot of people don't take responsibility for their failures and blame outside factors but even in a slow economy there are people whose business continue to boom.

I know that wishful thinking isn't the way to go. My own parents built 3 different successful business all from the ground up and have seen what it takes, so I'm no stranger to the things you talk about. I just wanted to know if the potential is there and from what you and precisionnails say, it is, but chances are slim...but isn't it like that with most other businesses too?
 Reply
#12
You're totally right - there is a risk in everything you do, but there are other professions with more consistency in the income potential.

That said, if this is your passion, the rewards of doing something you love are a huge pay-off in my book! I am putting a lot on the line to open my own salon right now, so if I didn't believe that, I wouldn't be doing it! Planning and a great support system are keys to success. It sounds like you've got the support, now just work on your plan and go for it!

 Reply
#13
(06-22-2013, 10:53 AM)plumgirl Wrote: You're totally right - there is a risk in everything you do, but there are other professions with more consistency in the income potential.

That said, if this is your passion, the rewards of doing something you love are a huge pay-off in my book! I am putting a lot on the line to open my own salon right now, so if I didn't believe that, I wouldn't be doing it! Planning and a great support system are keys to success. It sounds like you've got the support, now just work on your plan and go for it!


Oh wow! Congratulations on opening your own salon! I'm so excited for you!!! Please do keep us updated on how it goes.
 Reply
#14
We have many business owners in the family...some failed while others have been in business for decades. My question is really if nails have the potential to be a profitable industry otherwise I would rather invest my time, education, and energy in another passion.

Of course it has the potential but if YOU don't have the ability to create a quality product that makes people WANT to come back to you then no, you will NOT be profitable. There are too many variables that are at play, work ethics, children, sickness, your abilility to do nails, good location, income of your chosen area to work, etc.
There are some pretty good techs out there advertising McNail prices which I wouldn't work for. You've got to be able to turn out a set in 30 min. if you're going for cheap, and you'll have to work 8-10 hrs. a day to make enough to pay your bills. If you're going for high end, your workmanship better be flawless and your shop needs to be located in the high income area.
I've been doing this for over 25 years and I don't have a college degree. I currently make more than public school teachers in our area and I work much less than they do, only four days a week. There's others in town barely getting by so there you have it.......
 Reply
#15
(06-23-2013, 06:25 PM)Donna in Huntsville, TX. Wrote: We have many business owners in the family...some failed while others have been in business for decades. My question is really if nails have the potential to be a profitable industry otherwise I would rather invest my time, education, and energy in another passion.

Of course it has the potential but if YOU don't have the ability to create a quality product that makes people WANT to come back to you then no, you will NOT be profitable. There are too many variables that are at play, work ethics, children, sickness, your abilility to do nails, good location, income of your chosen area to work, etc.
There are some pretty good techs out there advertising McNail prices which I wouldn't work for. You've got to be able to turn out a set in 30 min. if you're going for cheap, and you'll have to work 8-10 hrs. a day to make enough to pay your bills. If you're going for high end, your workmanship better be flawless and your shop needs to be located in the high income area.
I've been doing this for over 25 years and I don't have a college degree. I currently make more than public school teachers in our area and I work much less than they do, only four days a week. There's others in town barely getting by so there you have it.......


Thank you all for the replies. It has all been very helpful. It's funny because I taught for 1 yr in a middle/high school and although I couldn't complain about the pay, I was working around the clock. Good teachers work harder than many of us can ever imagine!! It's not easy making sure 150 students get a quality education! Thank your children's teachers when you get a chance.

Donna, what is your salon set-up (home-based, in a salon, have your own nail salon place)? Is it just you or do you have employees? If yes, how many?

TIA
 Reply
#16
I booth rent in a salon suite building. It's just me and has been for the last 15 years. Had a salon once, decided that trying to find qualified people wasn't worth the headache. You'll find that to be the case with pretty much all salon owners at some time or another. As for my comment about the teachers, the county I'm has a State College, Sam Houston, has several prisons and admin offices for the same. Thousands of acres of National Forest are all around and for all the above reasons, there's little money in the way of school taxes to pay the teachers. THAT'S why I make more than most of them and definitely work much less.
BTW, I work 4 days a week, 9 am to 6 pm., Tues., thru Fri.
 Reply
#17
I think it is entirely achievable for a solo tech to earn 100k, and if you're in the right area/niche then I think it's possible in the 2-3 year mark. I was on track for that when I had to slow things down due to some health issues that are not treatable.

My average income was $58.77 per service. This number includes retail sales and art add-ons. I have a no gratuity salon, so there are no tips included in that number. Obviously I don't work full time, but if my health hadn't gotten in the way this is what a 48 week year might look like:

10 services per day =587.70
5 days/wk = 2,938.5 per week
48 weeks = $141,048

I used 48 weeks because it allows for more vacation time as well as training time. I've spoken with many techs who say they do 12-14 services per day, so 10 should be do-able even if you only fill your schedule to about 85-90% full - which I consider to be fully booked!

I think that if you're hitting those numbers, your entire overhead should only be 20% of the gross, which leaves you $112,838 less the wholesale price of retail (about 14k by these numbers), which puts your net profit at just under 100k.

You can see my menu/pricing on my website to get an idea for the prices I charge to generate my service average. I am a solo tech with no assistant, and I do have a nice variety of retail. It accounts for about 30% of my gross, which makes a big difference in take home pay. I generally only sell to my clients, and they appreciate the added service of being able to do some last minute gift shopping and saving an extra errand.

ps... I know these numbers might look unrealistic to some, but don't underestimate what you can charge if you build your business a certain way - and don't underestimate the power of retail dollars. I have literally had days where my gross receipts were $850-1,000 for a single DAY where I only completed around SIX services! My retail items range from $5-60, so I'm not selling anything expensive, AND I do NOT "sell" to my clients. I talk about retail items I am excited about, but really it's because they have an hour or so to sit looking at my retail items, and they truly do appreciate being able to save time by doing a little shopping at a business they are already going to be visiting!
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
 Reply
#18
(06-24-2013, 11:14 PM)Donna in Huntsville, TX. Wrote: I booth rent in a salon suite building. It's just me and has been for the last 15 years. Had a salon once, decided that trying to find qualified people wasn't worth the headache. You'll find that to be the case with pretty much all salon owners at some time or another. As for my comment about the teachers, the county I'm has a State College, Sam Houston, has several prisons and admin offices for the same. Thousands of acres of National Forest are all around and for all the above reasons, there's little money in the way of school taxes to pay the teachers. THAT'S why I make more than most of them and definitely work much less.
BTW, I work 4 days a week, 9 am to 6 pm., Tues., thru Fri.


Oh, I see! My nail tech (who is fab!!) also had the same difficulty as you of finding qualified people and in the end decided she was better off by herself. It's such a shame that the teachers in your area don't get paid much. What it basically comes down to is priorities and it seems that a lot of times teachers are at the bottom of the list...although everyone is always talking about how we need to do better in education. Undervaluing teachers is definitely not a way to make that happen!

(06-25-2013, 07:22 PM)CandiceAE Wrote: I think it is entirely achievable for a solo tech to earn 100k, and if you're in the right area/niche then I think it's possible in the 2-3 year mark. I was on track for that when I had to slow things down due to some health issues that are not treatable.

My average income was $58.77 per service. This number includes retail sales and art add-ons. I have a no gratuity salon, so there are no tips included in that number. Obviously I don't work full time, but if my health hadn't gotten in the way this is what a 48 week year might look like:

10 services per day =587.70
5 days/wk = 2,938.5 per week
48 weeks = $141,048

I used 48 weeks because it allows for more vacation time as well as training time. I've spoken with many techs who say they do 12-14 services per day, so 10 should be do-able even if you only fill your schedule to about 85-90% full - which I consider to be fully booked!

I think that if you're hitting those numbers, your entire overhead should only be 20% of the gross, which leaves you $112,838 less the wholesale price of retail (about 14k by these numbers), which puts your net profit at just under 100k.

You can see my menu/pricing on my website to get an idea for the prices I charge to generate my service average. I am a solo tech with no assistant, and I do have a nice variety of retail. It accounts for about 30% of my gross, which makes a big difference in take home pay. I generally only sell to my clients, and they appreciate the added service of being able to do some last minute gift shopping and saving an extra errand.

ps... I know these numbers might look unrealistic to some, but don't underestimate what you can charge if you build your business a certain way - and don't underestimate the power of retail dollars. I have literally had days where my gross receipts were $850-1,000 for a single DAY where I only completed around SIX services! My retail items range from $5-60, so I'm not selling anything expensive, AND I do NOT "sell" to my clients. I talk about retail items I am excited about, but really it's because they have an hour or so to sit looking at my retail items, and they truly do appreciate being able to save time by doing a little shopping at a business they are already going to be visiting!


Your response was immensely helpful to me! Thank you so much for including concrete figures and breaking things down. It has given me a MUCH clearer picture. I think your advice is spot on about not underestimating what you can charge. Well, actually, I think it's more not underestimating yourself!! There are many qualified techs who could be making much more if only they had the confidence to do so and charged what they were truly worth. I see it happening all the time at nail boards I frequent.

I never would have thought you could make so much extra with retailing. 30% is a lot! What kinds of things do you sell?

Do you have a home salon? rent a space in a salon? have your own nail salon?

I would love to take a look at your website. What is it?
 Reply
#19
Bump for another poster and to have above questions answered...still curious to know! Smile
 Reply
#20
You can read what was self-reported by 1400+ professionals in the Nails magazine annual survey: http://files.nailsmag.com/Market-Researc...3stats.pdf
Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
 Reply
#21
My website is in my signature (as is anyone else's, so you can check them out if there is a WWW button under their posts). I had a salon/gift shop in a retail space until just recently, I moved my studio (along with the retail) into my home in May.

30% is very achievable if you have the right assortment of items. In fact, I think that I could do even more if I were more aggressive with sales, i.e. attaching retail specials to service bundles or even just having sales, which I rarely do. While I do sell Cuccio and Lomasi (Young Nails) products and just a few other beauty related items, most of my retail dollars come in from jewelry (maybe 25% of retail) and gift items. I focus on made in the US gift items and represent about 45 artists/crafters right now in my shop. I keep my pricing to $5-$50 with just a few lines that are over that. I think right now my most expensive item is $110, but that is an exception. So far the retail is still going well with the move into my home - in fact when I told my clients I would be moving there were many who worried that I wouldn't continue the retail! I have never tried to advertise the retail to anyone other than my clients, so I have never relied on sales from people just coming in to shop. Having a really unique and well priced product assortment is a convenience for the clients and really does sell itself.


Just a little more (okay, a lot) about retail - Nails Magazine had asked me for some retail advice to print (I think it was in the Jan 2013 issue??), and this list is what I provided. These are the broad guidelines that I use in managing my retail. This is really rough copy - just the quick list I typed up for them - I'm sure they polished it up before publishing lol.

-think of retail as spreading a bunch of $20 bills all around your shop,
money invested in laying around on shelves had better regenerate money
that lands in your wallet! recognize slow movers and get them out fast
through sales, bundling product, or bundling slow moving product with
service specials.[/color]

-go wide and shallow - I have a limited audience for retail, the same
80-100 people coming in all the time, so I often can't sell 10 of anything
(except small items). So, my best strategy for personal care items or
fashion accessories is to carry the full range of products within a line,
but I try not to stock more than 3 of any particular item or scent.

-being invested in a line shows your clients that you believe in it, so if
you only bring in one scent when four are available, or only carry the
lotion, but not the scrub, then it tells them you are unsure and makes
them less likely to gamble their money on an uncertain purchase

-for larger items more suited to gifting (décor in my case), the rules
change a bit - you don't have to have a full range from one artist or
vendor if you have other items that they fit with. But if you're going to
carry some décor items, you need to have a range, not just one or two
items. Again, it goes back to the client seeing you are invested

-lines brought in should have a hook - these are just some that are
represented in my shop: made in the USA, hand crafted, the company employs
handicapped workers, family run business, recycled materials in the
product, solar power used in the manufacturing facilities, something
unique about the artist... And then make sure you know the talking points
and use them with clients.

-recognize if a particular item will only sell for a short time (everyone
who wanted one already bought), or seasonal, or ongoing sales. Items that
are consumable (candles, lotions) or giftable or collectible are good
items to carry year 'round.

-Décor items only seem to be giftable if they are small - people are
generally concerned with whether something will fit in the recipients
home, so items that can be put on small walls or tucked onto a shelf seem
to be the most popular

-make sure that every item you bring in fits in look, feel, quality and
price with what's already in your shop. I try to keep my retail range the
same as my service range - $6-$80. I have four retail "departments" and
when I'm thinking of a new line I compare it to others in the same area to
make sure it fits cohesively with what I already have

Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
 Reply
#22
(07-08-2013, 06:27 PM)CandiceAE Wrote: My website is in my signature (as is anyone else's, so you can check them out if there is a WWW button under their posts). I had a salon/gift shop in a retail space until just recently, I moved my studio (along with the retail) into my home in May.

30% is very achievable if you have the right assortment of items. In fact, I think that I could do even more if I were more aggressive with sales, i.e. attaching retail specials to service bundles or even just having sales, which I rarely do. While I do sell Cuccio and Lomasi (Young Nails) products and just a few other beauty related items, most of my retail dollars come in from jewelry (maybe 25% of retail) and gift items. I focus on made in the US gift items and represent about 45 artists/crafters right now in my shop. I keep my pricing to $5-$50 with just a few lines that are over that. I think right now my most expensive item is $110, but that is an exception. So far the retail is still going well with the move into my home - in fact when I told my clients I would be moving there were many who worried that I wouldn't continue the retail! I have never tried to advertise the retail to anyone other than my clients, so I have never relied on sales from people just coming in to shop. Having a really unique and well priced product assortment is a convenience for the clients and really does sell itself.


Just a little more (okay, a lot) about retail - Nails Magazine had asked me for some retail advice to print (I think it was in the Jan 2013 issue??), and this list is what I provided. These are the broad guidelines that I use in managing my retail. This is really rough copy - just the quick list I typed up for them - I'm sure they polished it up before publishing lol.

-think of retail as spreading a bunch of $20 bills all around your shop,
money invested in laying around on shelves had better regenerate money
that lands in your wallet! recognize slow movers and get them out fast
through sales, bundling product, or bundling slow moving product with
service specials.[/color]

-go wide and shallow - I have a limited audience for retail, the same
80-100 people coming in all the time, so I often can't sell 10 of anything
(except small items). So, my best strategy for personal care items or
fashion accessories is to carry the full range of products within a line,
but I try not to stock more than 3 of any particular item or scent.

-being invested in a line shows your clients that you believe in it, so if
you only bring in one scent when four are available, or only carry the
lotion, but not the scrub, then it tells them you are unsure and makes
them less likely to gamble their money on an uncertain purchase

-for larger items more suited to gifting (décor in my case), the rules
change a bit - you don't have to have a full range from one artist or
vendor if you have other items that they fit with. But if you're going to
carry some décor items, you need to have a range, not just one or two
items. Again, it goes back to the client seeing you are invested

-lines brought in should have a hook - these are just some that are
represented in my shop: made in the USA, hand crafted, the company employs
handicapped workers, family run business, recycled materials in the
product, solar power used in the manufacturing facilities, something
unique about the artist... And then make sure you know the talking points
and use them with clients.

-recognize if a particular item will only sell for a short time (everyone
who wanted one already bought), or seasonal, or ongoing sales. Items that
are consumable (candles, lotions) or giftable or collectible are good
items to carry year 'round.

-Décor items only seem to be giftable if they are small - people are
generally concerned with whether something will fit in the recipients
home, so items that can be put on small walls or tucked onto a shelf seem
to be the most popular

-make sure that every item you bring in fits in look, feel, quality and
price with what's already in your shop. I try to keep my retail range the
same as my service range - $6-$80. I have four retail "departments" and
when I'm thinking of a new line I compare it to others in the same area to
make sure it fits cohesively with what I already have


Exclamation Sorry, I hadn't realized you had replied! Thank for your thorough post. Like many other posts here, it has been so helpful and thank you for taking the time to respond. What an incredible article you wrote for nails mag...*runs to go subscribe*... I have printed out this thread, bookmarked it, read it, and reread it!

I think your website wasn't appearing because all I could see was the mobile version on my computer...but that's fixed and I see it now Smile

Thanks everyone for chiming in!
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