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organic gel*hypo-allergenic gel*poly gel*no chemicals*no monomers
#1
I've been researching GEL lines & it's making me nuts!
I want to offer SOMETHING DIFFERENT- that all these other salons locally aren't offering! They usually offer the "big brand" lines.
I have looked into organic- poly- shiny-wear & tear- lifting-one step-how to apply----anyone else do these crazy things?
What do you use for Hard Gel & why? The more I look the more I'm finding & make myself more unsure. I do have about 3 lines I've tried & like - but then I think maybe I should try a trial kit from XYZ company too!!!!
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#2
I can't speak to gel enhancements, because we only offer natural nail services, but I have tried a lot of organic product lines out and researched alternatives for polish. My salon services will only incoporate natural and organic ingredients (lotions, scrubs, etc), and I have tried to find an organic or natural nail polish to no avail. There area few water-based polishes, but based on reviews of wearability and special care, it just doesn't seem like a good option.

I am offering OPI, because there is an expectation to carry it by a lot of clients. I also offer Zoya polish and Cuccio polish/gel polish, which many have not heard of, and not many local salons offer. All are 3-free and Zoya is also vegan and camphor-free, so that is a differentiator.

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#3
Do yourself a favor and pick a line and stick with it. It's not that all gels are created equal, but they're pretty similiar. The consistency is usually the difference. I use hard gel and have for years. Why...because no one else in town was doing it! I've tried lots of lines of gels, they're all good. If you have a problem with any of them it's generally pilot error just like with acrylics.
There's nothing wrong with adding a gel line that offers something the other one doesn't, such as 3D ability. Find a primer that works for you, learn the technique best suited for your working style and the strive to be the best you can be in your area offering things no other salon does. THAT'S what sets you apart, not what product you're using. Most of the time, the client could absolutely care less what you're using as long as you do a great job with it.
One last thing, imo, the whole 'organic' thing with gels is a bunch of 'horse apples'. Do some research on that and you'll find it's a gimmick, see this link, http://www.beautytech.com/forums/showthread.php?tid=647. There's is a co. that calls itself Organic Nails but it's acrylic I believe and they're not making the claim their product is 'organic'.
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#4
That's interesting - thank you! I've looked @ Simply Organic Gel nails- very interesting I must admit -- anyone use this? And Quintessence Gel seems similar as well. I love Masterworks - that's a fav & Amy is awesome! Gre. at company & great support with an awesome Gel-Gel paints & Gel Colors! I've been looking into Gelousy & LE as well.
I think the idea of Organic is so appealing- but realistically application & tech technique is most important!
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#5
Marketing tells you a lot about the integrity of a brand, and whether it respects your intelligence and professionalism.

Do yourself a favor and watch Doug Schoon's video about "organic" products: http://www.dougschoon.com/video-Give-Me-...ganic.html

I've used LE for years and am very satisfied. Excellent products developed by a real polymer chemist, owner Jim McConnell, and supported by wonderful educators and staff. I also appreciate reasonable pricing (bi-monthly specials and show deals) and the ability to buy direct online.
Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
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#6
(05-28-2013, 09:11 AM)PrecisionNails Wrote: Marketing tells you a lot about the integrity of a brand, and whether it respects your intelligence and professionalism.

Do yourself a favor and watch Doug Schoon's video about "organic" products: http://www.dougschoon.com/video-Give-Me-...ganic.html


Doug's article is actually very misleading. He focuses on the definition of the words "organic" and "natural", and yes, he is obviously correct in everything he says, but there is a much deeper story. The use of the word "organic" is commonly also known to refer to agricultural goods grown without the use of pesticides and that are not genetically-modified and organic goods are created using these products. The USDA (not FDA) has applied new regulations to using the word "organic" in cosmetics made of agricultural-based ingredients during the 6 years since this was written. A product must be made with 70% or more organic ingredients to use the term, and USDA labeling, and then it varies from "made with organic ingredients" to "organic". That said, there are other private labelers that the USDA and FDA do not regulate - so if a company wants to slap a label that says "Organic, per the Santa Clause Society" on a box, it is free to do that - we as consumers just have to know that it is not USDA certified. Doug poo-poos the whole idea of using natural and organic ingredients by claiming they can also be toxic, attempting to destroy the credibility of using these products. He fails to bring in the concept of organic and natural (properly labeled, of course) being healthier because they do not contain toxic synthetic ingredients like parabens, phthlatates, etc.

Also, as far as the "regulation" of our cosmetics industry, the US is a joke. "Cosmetic products and ingredients are not subject to FDA premarket approval authority, with the exception of color additives." Cosmetics companies can put whatever they want into their products as long as it has not been deemed hazardous for humans at certain percentages - of one product. Most consumers do not take into account the sheer number of potentially toxic chemicals they put on their body each day. A 2% concentration in your face cream won't hurt you, but add on the shampoo, conditioner, lipstick, deodorant, body lotion and perfume, and guess what - you've just put a toxic dump on your body.

That's not to say that organic or natural are the best or only options. There are many synthetic and lab-made ingredients that are perfectly fine for our use - it's about understanding which ones are good and which ones are harmful. In Europe, companies must prove an ingredient is safe before they can use it; in the US, it can be used until it is proven unsafe. Phthalates, for example, have been banned in Europe for ten years, yet US companies can still add them to cosmetics sold in the US. In fact, multi-national companies will sell different formulas of the same product in the US and Europe to comply with this ban.

The Environmental Working Group is my bible for understanding ingredients in products.
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#7
So much to consider & so confusing on what to believe.... guessing I'm an honest Abe looking for something that will "help" my client vs harm!
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#8
(05-28-2013, 11:32 AM)ctonramk[email protected] Wrote: So much to consider & so confusing on what to believe.... guessing I'm an honest Abe looking for something that will "help" my client vs harm!


It is, unfortunately, very confusing because the regulations standards just aren't there. The lobbyists have done their jobs, I guess. The other issue is that there are dozens of organizations that do use organic ingredients, but can't afford to get their products labeled as organic. Also, ingredients like clay and sea salt cannot be labeled organic, so products like scrubs that have these as the majority ingredient can't be labeled organic.

Basically it comes down to reading labels and if you don't know what something is, the EWG database is extremely helpful in deciphering the safety of something.

Also, whether you think "organic" is "better" for you or not - knowing that I am using products that are produced under organic standards makes me feel better about using them knowing they are not polluting the Earth and the workers who deal with them with pesticides.
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#9
That makes sense & many reasons I m looking @ Simply Organic Gel..... I guess the question remains- is it really & will it make a difference to a client in the long run?
Has anyone heard of this brand??????
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#10
(05-28-2013, 01:43 PM)[email protected] Wrote: That makes sense & many reasons I m looking @ Simply Organic Gel..... I guess the question remains- is it really & will it make a difference to a client in the long run?
Has anyone heard of this brand??????


Because this is not an agricultural-based product, it cannot be called "organic" in the context of how its components are grown.

This is a case of "green-washing" from what I can read. Monomers are not a bad thing - it just describes a type of molecular chain. There are monomers that are bad for you, but monomers as a whole are not bad.

Their FAQs say they use no acrylic monomers - which many/most gels don't. This product is most likely just like anything else you would use for this application.
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#11
Interesting & thank you- I'm new to nails & thought I was onto something fabulous!
Which the product can be- but I want to make sure I'm understanding if it's just like everything else with a fancy name or not?
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#12
I use Angel Love and I love it and have used it for years! The primer is protein based. No methacrylic acid. It is a hard gel that when done correctly finishes thin and strong. You mix the pigments with the gel so your color can be customized or the same each time I mix it. My client can go 4 to 6 weeks between appointments. I have tried many products and this is by far the best one I have used. Angel Love Gel Nails. Heart
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#13
i used the nail gel polish and nail kit with our brand, the gel polish is with many colors, and if you need cutomized color, your colors could be accepted. besides, there are there types for gel polish: three-steps, one-step and soak-off nail polish.  
with nail art kit when you creating your own design at home, it could save your cost from nail-salon~~  
# beauty.geekhigh.com/ #
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#14
I use Young nails concealer pink hard gel but about 4 months ago I started getting a reaction on my right hand, so did my co worker. My right hand started getting dry and cracked really bad then started to heal after putting antibiotic ointment on for 2 months but still hasn't gone back to normal, I have discolored skin on my fingers and they also itch every once in a while.. I started using gloves but it seems like it doesn't help. does anyone else recommend another hard gel? has anyone used Crystal nails or Bio Sculpture?
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