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Soak off
#1
Do soak off nails damage the nail plate. Has anyone consistently done soak offs, no matter the brand an have no damage done to the natural nail. Thank you !
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#2
They can damage the nail if they are not removed correctly just like any other form of nail enhancement.
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#3
I honestly don't understand. I have seen nails damaged with soaking them off only and also using the wraps.
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#4
Maybe, hun, what ya are seeing is the damage done to the nail in how they were improperly applied. If the nail is roughed up or not carefully e-filed that could damage the nail also.

If the nails are properly soaked off then there is no damage. Ya could see a nail that might be a little thin and weak.

Hope that answers ya ?
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#5
So what I'm reading is, that when the product is removed properly there is no damage to the nail. The nail has the exact same integrity as was prior to a gel application.
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#6
over use of the acetone to remove the sog can/will dry out the nail if it's not properly hydrated. I use lots of oil in with the acetone to help prevent this. The sog should be allowed to completely release from the nail on it's own during the soaking. It's the aggressive use of tools 'helping' the sog to release that causes damage, not the sog.
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#7
(09-16-2012, 07:26 PM)its an art Wrote: So what I'm reading is, that when the product is removed properly there is no damage to the nail. The nail has the exact same integrity as was prior to a gel application.



If the product is applied and removed properly there should not be loss of integrity to the nail.

After removal of soak off products, ya do a service, right? When ya do a service ya moisturize in some way; apply cuticle oil, lotion with a massage, etc. That puts moisture back into the nails after removal of product. And if the clients are doing whatcha tell them to in applying their cuticle oil every night, that also replenishes their nails, right?



(09-16-2012, 10:32 PM)Donna in Huntsville, TX. Wrote: over use of the acetone to remove the sog can/will dry out the nail if it's not properly hydrated. I use lots of oil in with the acetone to help prevent this. The sog should be allowed to completely release from the nail on it's own during the soaking. It's the aggressive use of tools 'helping' the sog to release that causes damage, not the sog.



If ya do this after removal of product and ya want to re-apply immediately after removal, doesn't the oil saturating into the nail plate interfere with the new application of product? Especially gel? Justa checking with ya, so I understand better. Thank ya!

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#8
(09-17-2012, 12:21 AM)Luvglitter Wrote:
(09-16-2012, 07:26 PM)its an art Wrote: So what I'm reading is, that when the product is removed properly there is no damage to the nail. The nail has the exact same integrity as was prior to a gel application.



If the product is applied and removed properly there should not be loss of integrity to the nail.

After removal of soak off products, ya do a service, right? When ya do a service ya moisturize in some way; apply cuticle oil, lotion with a massage, etc. That puts moisture back into the nails after removal of product. And if the clients are doing whatcha tell them to in applying their cuticle oil every night, that also replenishes their nails, right?



(09-16-2012, 10:32 PM)Donna in Huntsville, TX. Wrote: over use of the acetone to remove the sog can/will dry out the nail if it's not properly hydrated. I use lots of oil in with the acetone to help prevent this. The sog should be allowed to completely release from the nail on it's own during the soaking. It's the aggressive use of tools 'helping' the sog to release that causes damage, not the sog.



If ya do this after removal of product and ya want to re-apply immediately after removal, doesn't the oil saturating into the nail plate interfere with the new application of product? Especially gel? Justa checking with ya, so I understand better. Thank ya!


I've never had a problem with doing it this way. Once the sog is off the nail, you'll go thru the same steps to reapply that you normally would. Correct prep removes the surface oil and thats all that needs to come off, right?
There's a remover out there that everyone raves about, can't remember whether it's for Shellac or OPI, but it doesn't dry the nails out. I haven't ever read the ingredients but I bet if I did, it would contain some kind of moisturizer.

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#9
"If the product is applied and removed properly there should not be loss of integrity to the nail. "

I would add "If the product is applied, maintained and removed properly there should not be loss of integrity to the nail."

While techs can do damage to nails with improper application and removal, clients can do damage to their own nails by failing to maintain them properly, using them as tools, or biting, picking and peeling. While moisturizing during treatment is great, it can't undo weeks of exposure to harsh chemicals and failing to moisturize.
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#10
(09-16-2012, 04:48 PM)its an art Wrote: Do soak off nails damage the nail plate. Has anyone consistently done soak offs, no matter the brand an have no damage done to the natural nail. Thank you !


If you soak off properly letting the acetone penetrate the nail product to remove should be no problem. Damage comes from prying them off or rough scraping. let the acetone do the work

http://www.quicksoakbowl.com
on my site read Doug Schoon page very good info on soaking off nails
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#11
Thank Ya Donna for the reply. I'm always a little apprehensive to use oil prior to applying gel. Have had issues in the past, even if I use 99% alcohol to remove it. I might give it a go and see what happens.
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#12
Hair clients spent way more to damage their hair (dry out) and spend much more on conditioning products than a tiny bottle of cuticle oil.

we need to push the client to to use oil daily and be up front and honest that the long lasting look is a trade of for exposure to remover that will dry out their nails, just like hair color or bleach.

cuticle oil is like conditioner for hair.
J Pham
No boundaries, just possibility.

http://www.facebook.com/jphamfb
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#13
(09-18-2012, 05:03 PM)artdesigninc Wrote: Hair clients spent way more to damage their hair (dry out) and spend much more on conditioning products than a tiny bottle of cuticle oil.

we need to push the client to to use oil daily and be up front and honest that the long lasting look is a trade of for exposure to remover that will dry out their nails, just like hair color or bleach.

cuticle oil is like conditioner for hair.


Well, that is like trying to make a horse drink water. Ya can tell them til you are blue in the face and preach and preach about needing to use oil every day, but we can't make em. I have some that I have been preaching that to em for years and they still won't do it.....sigh

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#14
it took years for the hair industry to get peoples to use conditioner too.
we can keep pushing or give up on it, it is what it is soaking = dry nails, we can keep talking about it or companies have to come up with a moisturizing gel formula lol.
J Pham
No boundaries, just possibility.

http://www.facebook.com/jphamfb
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