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What advertisement works best to get customers??
#26
Punch cards are good, but they are better aimed at building repeat business than bringing in new business.

It sounds like you are getting feedback from existing clients that they are referring you to new people. I went through that too, but the challenge was to get those referred people to actually come in for an appointment: what worked for me was to print a new customer offer on the back of my cards. I gave a $5.00 discount to the new client as well as to the existing client who referred the new client. That promotion was the single greatest promotion I've ever offered.

But that was also back in the early 90's. I still think it's a great promotion, but today I would also suggest taking your online presence very seriously: Create a Facebook page for your business and then make sure you post from it everyday.

The advice on not building your own website really hinges on some things. For instance, what sort of business are you running? A glossy, professional online presence will appeal to a lot of people. But I get a lot of traffic to my humble self-maintained site on Blogspot.

If you choose to keep a blog with your site (like mine) make sure you update that blog. I aim for at least once a month (but I'm not always great about making that goal.)

Social media has taught people to expect constact updates and interaction. If you put up a Facebook page or a website/blog and never update it, people will assume you are out of business.

Beyond these things: hustle. Get out of your chair, go outside and start shaking hands and handing out cards the old fashioned way. And if you aren't the sort that is comfortable doing this, find someone who is, do their nails for free, put a stack of cards in their hand, and send them out to do your bidding.

Maggie Franklin: Art of Nailz, Visalia CA
http://blogs.nailsmag.com/maggie
http://www.artofnailz.biz
 Reply
#27
(08-28-2012, 11:01 PM)anointdhndz Wrote: Hey NC...how exactly did u do the YP search?? Is it a straight $50 one time fee or how does that work? And what is the reasoning behind the smaller, more frequent ads work better?? Just for the fact that they see the name over and over?? Thanks..it was some good ,solid advice....Smile



Call and speak to someone at YP and tell them you are interested in getting the mobile search ad for "Nail Salons". They will be able to tell you if the space is open. There are 2 slots for each search topic. If those two spots are already taken you would have to wait till someone gives it up to get it. I have it set up for auto payment so it automatically charges me monthly for my advertising.

Repetition of advertisements is more important than size. It's a proven fact that smaller more frequent ad's are more beneficial to your business than larger less frequent ones. You don't need to be huge, you just need to be consistently in the eyes of the market. It takes people on average seeing your ad 3 times before they will act on it. So you want to stay in the public eye. I can tell you from experience that it has worked for me. We have some really well read, well done local magazines and I have a contract with one for a business card size ad I run EVERY month at $125 and it brings in the Benjamin's! Another good tid bit of advice is ALWAYS try to get the most for your money! Don't think for one minute that these magazines don't need you as much as you need them. I always ask, "what can you do for me if I commit to you?" I ask for editorials which are a HUGE business booster!!! The best way to do this is to assure them so many months of business. I agreed to pay for 6 months of advertising and they did a 1 page editorial on Me which brought in a ton of business. Then when my 6 months was up, they called me to re-up my contract and don't think I wasn't asking what they were going to do for me. I agreed to sign a 1 yr contract this time and they agreed to once again give me an editorial. You can't be afraid to ask. Then the magazine that really seems to appreciate your business and gives you the biggest bang for your buck is who you need to work with! always remember the worst anyone can say is "no", and if they do, walk away!

(08-28-2012, 11:30 PM)CandiceAE Wrote: I built my own website, and it looks pretty professional, I think! Smile There are some really great templates you can buy and they are pretty plug and play, although I couldn't help tweaking mine to make it a little more "Panache".

There are some good suggestions here - if you read the Nails Magazine blogs, the Coaching Chronicles has some really excellent low cost (no spendy ads) methods to reach out in your community and build your business.

I'm trying to remember the various things I've done over the last 3 years...

-Referral program - $5-$10 per referral (usually $5, but when I want to build faster I bump it to $10)

-We have a little free local publication - two years ago I ran 3 months (7 issues) worth of ads - I think I only got about 4-5 new people per month from it, but two years later half those people are still clients! The key here is that is a publication primarily read by locals who read it because it has a comprehensive list of things going on in the area. People looking for entertainment have money... Smile

-Give ONE "Send a friend" coupon to very specific existing clients - people who absolutely love what you do and are committed to your success - and ask them to be very deliberate about who they give it to, ie someone they feel very strongly would be a good client. The send a friend coupon should be a deep discount, but I don't recommend free services.

-put together promotional fliers/offers and hand deliver them to local business'

That's all I can think of - really I just go with referrals, but I'm getting ready to start running an ad again!



Building your own website will save you some money but it will cost you good searchability. A good web designer knows how to code key words right into your website so it jumps out into search engines. They just know what is well read on a website and what is not. They will tell you that flash is NOT a good idea because it slows down computers and a lot of people don't care for that when looking at websites and will go to the next website. I started out making my own website as well and business quadrupled when I let a professional get ahold of it. Templates just don't understand each business individually, they create a generic website that any business can plug in. You want a website that knows what your client wants, and how they want to look for information. I just know in my own experience I have clients tell me all the time they chose my spa because they where the most impressed by the level of professionalism exuded on my website.
Gina, nail tech. NC
 Reply
#28
What is your website address?
Anna
 Reply
#29
Um, did you LOOK at my website? I've been on sites that people paid big money for that can't touch a really good quality template! And as Maggie said, it really depends on the look you're trying to create - when I had just a blog people still found me and came in based on the blog content. As for key words and building them in, don't be afraid of that! When using a quality template, you can build them right in - there are specific places to add them and the software embeds them for you. Remember, not everyone has money to pay for a designer site, but that doesn't have to stop them from having a website.
Something I just started for the ad I'm running is a new client special - a gel manicure, hand facial and my basic pedicure - my price doesn't matter, but it's a good deal compared to full price. I consider someone to be "new" if they haven't been in for 90 days since that's past our typical cycle even for pedicures.

Here's how I structured the special:
1- took the price of my gel mani less 20%
2- A hand facial is $22 in my shop or $10 if added to any nail service and I don't book extra time for it, so the cost to me is really about a dollar, so I didn't charge at all in the special
3- basic pedi price less 20%
This really works for them (saving $33 in my case), and it works for me because it's really only $13 less income (not counting the hand facial) and normally I would book 2.25 hrs for these two services separately, but since it will be one client for both, I will book it at 2 hrs. I can actually do it in 1.75 hrs if I need to squeeze someone in, but I like a breather between clients.

Three things that I will for sure do to promote this (I may come up with more)
1) tell existing clients about the special because it gives their referrals incentive to come in (they get $10 for each referral right now)
2) placing an ad in a local publication
3) send a letter to my existing clients who haven't been to the salon in a while

Another possibility - if the salon you're in has a client database, maybe the salon could send out "lost" client letters - basically, we miss you, come back and we'll give you X.
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
 Reply
#30
My website is http://www.bamboospalkn.com. Candice I bartered most of my website. Hardly payed any money out of pocket. Thats another good thing about working with small professional companies, and I highly Recomend doing it, most will barter if not all most of the initial costs. From that point I only pay if I need to change anything and it's very cheap unless I was doing something substantial like adding a page or something. It's not like I was rolling in money starting a business and had thousands of dollars to put into a website. Just used my resources and made out very well in the end. We all have the ability to barter!
I and 1 more thing if you go to it from a smart phone it's going to go to a mobile site. Another highly recommended for of advertisement! That I invested in for 1 yr completely free thru dudamobile. It actually did most of the work for me and I added or changed a few things but not much. It was supposed to do iPads as well but I need to call dudamobile to find out why it didn't convert my site I them. It's easily navigated and can click to call and duda sends you a report weekly or so to let you know how much activity you have gotten. The best part is it only cost maybe $6 a month after the first year! Such an awesome deal!!!
Gina, nail tech. NC
 Reply
#31
Now we cooking with gas...lol...loving the advice cause its helping to get new customers in the door..one of the hardest parts of this bizness is building a clientele..(next to mastering the application techniques) Thanx to all for the advice!
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#32
Well i wanted to add one thing that just dropped in my lap...i won the ebook from Millie off the NTradio contest and i tell you what---- that woman has got it together!!!!! I know ive had good ideas over the years....but her ebook is extrodinary.....i wld recommend everyone needing to build buy the ebook!! Im pretty sure its only $20...& it has some of the best marketing advice that ive ever heard....i am sooooo excited to have one this!!! And NO i do not work for Millie or get a % for recommendations...just sayin....but i guarantee it will be the most profitable twenty bucks uve spent in a long time!!!! Thanks Millie for your experience and sharing with us!!! Smile
" Take time.....to be kind".....
Angel
~Tracy~

Full Time single mom,
Medical Receptionist &
Part Time Nail Artist
Akron, OH
 Reply
#33
You can only do what feels right for you in the case of money and your business. What one person may be willing to take on or feel savvy enough to do may not be for another. For that matter maybe they could but don't feel like spending time or on that part of their business so they chose to fork out the money, barter or use what we call here the 'good ole boy' network.


In my case, I have a Google Sites website, Google Places, Google Analytics and Google Webmaster tools and many more FREE. I created my own site using a template also free. The only thing I pay for is my domain name (URL) for my website quarterly (roughly $12 per month). Also Google has an option that when checked allows my site to convert to mobile. Like Candice stated, I have embedded keywords and other SEO although I am sure a pro could tweak some more things. Either way it was free other than costing some time. Right now of which I have entirely too much.

http://www.nailraising.com


When I thinking of 'advertising' I think of 'ads' like newspaper, flyers, ad at local theatre before the move begins, sponsorships for schools or organizations, or through USPS like EDDM Every Door Direct Mail kinds of ideas that may have worked for anyone.

The tidbit of information about size ad and how often was real information I could sink my teeth.

When I think of marketing, I think of websites, brochures, business cards, flyers, referral cards etc.

Maybe they are one in the same :Confusedhrug::

I am not a brick and mortar nor am I in a salon. I have really gone at this in a bassackwards (how many know that term?) kind of way and mostly certainly I know this - DAILY. BUT! Even a brick and mortar has to start somewhere with their advertising to get the word of mouth going.

I met with a rep from the local paper here the other day and am waiting for her to come back with rates/options soon. My gut was saying to go with something 3-6 months too so I am now glad to here in small ad with many repetitions is more worthwhile.

Anyone else have any tidbits?

Candace I like your promo idea.
Anna
 Reply
#34
Get Millies book!!" Their are Tons of tidbits!" Lol..no seriously..she breaks everytg down so u can understand it. A-B-C...123...its so simple...honestly.....ppls ideas ive heard on this board are good and ive learned alot..but im telling u..nothing compares to it!! I promise....im telling u ppl..for what u invest in a dinner out cld help you for your whole career...Smile
" Take time.....to be kind".....
Angel
~Tracy~

Full Time single mom,
Medical Receptionist &
Part Time Nail Artist
Akron, OH
 Reply
#35
Gina & Candice have shared some good starting points for creating a website.


One tip of recommendation that I would *highly highly* suggest to both of you, and to everyone else who has a website, is to setup an email optin form. Why? Because when you have an email list of customers/potentials, you can contact them directly to let them know about a special you are running. You can even run your own Groupon type of special, without needing to pay Groupon.


I would caution anyone against using a coupon mailer or any sort of mass print advertising because you don't know the EXACT demographics of who you are reaching. This is why internet marketing is so popular, because for instance when I run ads on Facebook, I can choose my ads to ONLY show to females, who are say 25-45 and located within X number of miles from the salon. For Valentines Day I could run an ad to promote to married men to come in and buy a gift certificate for their wife. You can't do that kind of stuff away from the internet. And for the example of the V-day promo, why should you pay for advertising that reaches the mail box of single men? Sure maybe they have a mom or sister or whoever... but the point is that you are still paying for reaching all those other people who never would've been interested in your ad to begin with. Not to mention, with mass print advertising it's incredibly difficult to track & get stats. Sure they might give you stats like the number of households they'll send it out to, but that doesn't tell you how many people 1.) actually received it (due to mail getting lost or forwarded, etc), 2.) how many even opened it, 3.) how many even saw your ad, etc. There's so many important variables left out that'll leave you cluelessly trying to piece together and understand how effective it was or wasn't. Buuuuut, certain forms of internet marketing can do that for you.


Effective marketing is all about putting out the right message, in front of the right person, at the right time.


NOT about blasting it out to as many as people and praying something sticks.
7 year Nail Tech turned internet marketing coach for salons & local businesses.

http://Facebook.com/StephanieMHenry

Skype: StephanieH1517

All customers & clients & friends are welcome to talk to me on Skype. I answer questions and PMs when I'm inbetween coaching sessions.
 Reply
#36
I just got a call from yp.com this week about the mobile search thing. They have updated it to include three businesses, which after seeing a previous posts it was only two, tells me they are about making money, not just listing you on the internet. And it wasn't $50 it is $79/month. But it could be if you sign up at a lower rate you stay at that rate, which is what has happened with me on my internet listing with them.

As far as the website thing, it matters a great deal where ya sign up for hosting your website. Some of the really cheap ones will own your website address, which means you can't move it around with hosting companies. And I agree with getting a professional web designer to do your website. I had someone from church do mine and it was a total waste of time and money and I got no business from it which was loss of income as well. Found out later, from a professional designer, that the way it was set up didn't allow google to recognize anything on my website and there were no search words set up, so no one could find me. Since I've had my website redone and gone with yp.com for advertising my new calls have greatly improved.

But as said before, ya got to find out what works for ya!!
 Reply
#37
(09-02-2012, 09:45 AM)Luvglitter Wrote: I just got a call from yp.com this week about the mobile search thing. They have updated it to include three businesses, which after seeing a previous posts it was only two, tells me they are about making money, not just listing you on the internet. And it wasn't $50 it is $79/month. But it could be if you sign up at a lower rate you stay at that rate, which is what has happened with me on my internet listing with them.

As far as the website thing, it matters a great deal where ya sign up for hosting your website. Some of the really cheap ones will own your website address, which means you can't move it around with hosting companies. And I agree with getting a professional web designer to do your website. I had someone from church do mine and it was a total waste of time and money and I got no business from it which was loss of income as well. Found out later, from a professional designer, that the way it was set up didn't allow google to recognize anything on my website and there were no search words set up, so no one could find me. Since I've had my website redone and gone with yp.com for advertising my new calls have greatly improved.

But as said before, ya got to find out what works for ya!!


All the advertising companies are about making money Wink You can always negotiate. I always ask for lower prices than what they offer and usually make out better than what was originally offered. I do have to say since upping my monthly advertising with them the calls seem to be coming in so I do think that it makes a difference. With my advertising campaign through Yp.com and in addition my mobile web search I spend around $150 a month but I see a huge difference from only spending $70 a month for a year with a smaller campaign. I canceled my yellowbook (different company) advertising because I saw very little business come in through it, took the money I was spending on that and put it towards yp to make a bigger impact and it's working. So a lot of times it's trial and error. I just hired on a 3rd tech and me and my first tech are 99% booked all the time. We turn people away daily! Thank god for the 3rd tech!! Hopefully now we can get the over flow in. There are always going to be the last minute call ins (that drive me nuts) calling for 2 people to come In for mani's and pedi's at the same time right then (thank you chop shops) that I can do nothing about but tell them they need to plan in advance for us to accommodate them. But your just not going to be able to please them all Wink


On the subject of coupons, I caution you....I feel that if you put coupons out there your clients will not value your service at full price. I know for some they swear by coupons but for me I want my clients to value me at full price. If you do a pedicure for $50 and you then discount it to $25 what does that say about your service? I am only really worth $25. I have built a business now 3 techs strong, booked non stop with never using 1 coupon! And don't even get me started on living social and groupon! That is NO way to build a business. I assume every salon or spa using a deal like that is in jeopardy of going out of business and desperate to bring in some instant cash flow. They suck you in by saying no other form of advertising is going to bring that many people through your door and your not paying for all those people, bull poopy your not paying, do the math in most cases you have LOST money on your "deal" thus setting you backwards rather than forwards and on top of it that person is more than likely NOT going to stay a faithful loyal customer but instead buy their next pedi or mani from the cheapest deal on groupon. You have to be smart when running a business and I just don't think in our business groupon works. For a resturant it works great because most patrons will by more than the meal thus only giving away maybe $10-$15 a meal. Or a clothing store that gives away some money to get in the door, you know your going to spend more than the $50 the groupon is worth. In our industry there is very little up selling from what we put out there. So we are giving away the whole shebang without having any room to make more money. Honestly I wish that spas and salons would just stop putting themselves in deals like this so that we can drive the price back up in our industry where it belongs! Chop shops have devalued our services and now groupons have done the same. Don't devalue yourself with coupons instead list all the reasons you are worth it to come and see! The other thing I have done that has brought me so much business and probably has been the single most important thing for my advertising is a simple sentence saying "American owned and operated". People will call when they see that! I also keep the look of my ad almost exactly the same when running in published magazines maybe just changing wording every now and then. It's called branding. You want people to recognize your brand without having to read your ad and know its you. This will bring people in as well because they keep seeing you. Ok I'm done this is the longest response ever from my iPhone. Lol. Sorry for any typos Wink it's a challenge from the phone sometimes.
Gina, nail tech. NC
 Reply
#38
(09-02-2012, 09:56 AM)nailtechNC28117 Wrote: And don't even get me started on living social and groupon! That is NO way to build a business. I assume every salon or spa using a deal like that is in jeopardy of going out of business and desperate to bring in some instant cash flow. They suck you in by saying no other form of advertising is going to bring that many people through your door



The thing with ANY of these deal sites is that they can work beautifully *if* you have an entire strategy around how you will fully capture all your customers in order to market to them again in the future. They always have been (and always will be) a quick easy fix to get a surge of customers through the door, and then it's your responsibility to get them to come back. Just because deal customers don't tend to come back on their own doesn't mean Groupon or any of these deal sites failed. They delivered on their job, which was to bring a bunch of people through the door that you normally wouldn't have had.


So you might be asking then how do you get them to come back? Well you need to add them to a customer list database, like an email list or an SMS (text message) list. The SMS is the best option, but email is still better than none. Why should you have an internet based customer list? Because you need a chance to reach out to them when YOU need to. Not sit and wait a week for a postcard to go out (and hope they even receive it, when you factor in stuff disappearing in the mail). Or worse yet, sit around and wait for the customer to come back/call back, etc. Americans have ridiculously busy lives nowadays, you cannot count on them to call *you* back when it's time.


For instance, I last had my hair done in the middle of April. They tried to book my next appointment while I was there (which obviously you should do)... but I know me, and I know how I travel a lot for my marketing stuff, and I wouldn't pick a date while there because I didn't want to chance forgetting about it, and then have to cancel on short notice, etc. Do you think I've heard from them this entire time? Nope. Not even once. So when I *am* ready to go get my hair done again, do you think I'll necessarily go out of my way to go back there again? Not really. They've forgotten about me just as much as I've forgotten about them. Sure the girl did a good job on my hair, but we as Americans have extremely busy lives... and guess what's one factor that gets precedence over others 9 times out of 10?...... convenience. So when I am ready, if I wanted to go to that particular place again I'll have to remember the name of the place, track down their website, and then give them a call. Unless she did some sort of stellar bang up job on my hair, am I going to go through all of that? Nope!


Now is the perfect time to re-quote something that I had already said earlier, which is...

"Effective marketing is all about putting out the right message, in front of the right person, at the right time."

I might just put that into my signature line lol Smile

Anywho, the way that relates to my salon example is that had they added me to at least an email list, or better yet an SMS list, they would've been able to remind me 3 months down the road to 1.) not only that it's time to get my hair done, but 2.) it's time to get my hair done and the phone number where I should call to do so.

It's the right message: that I need to come back to get my hair done

In front of the right person: yep, I would be the perfect person since I would've already been a customer of theirs

At the right time: every single service under the sun that we, as nail techs, perform have an expected return date for the client. For this salon example, they know darn well as I'm walking out the door that I should be coming back in 3 months. So they simply pre-program that into the system and then they don't have to think about it anymore.


Imagine this, when your new client is walking out the door after just having had their nails done, you KNOW they'll be due to come back in 2 weeks. Maaaybe 3 weeks if they're lucky.... or maybe even 4 weeks if they're just one of those odd cases. So if you have the client on an email or SMS list, you can set it up where it'll automatically alert them 9-10 days from now that they're due to come back.

Again, it's all about sending out the right message, to the right person, at the right time.

7 year Nail Tech turned internet marketing coach for salons & local businesses.

http://Facebook.com/StephanieMHenry

Skype: StephanieH1517

All customers & clients & friends are welcome to talk to me on Skype. I answer questions and PMs when I'm inbetween coaching sessions.
 Reply
#39
That's a fairly standard saying in the marketing world, and for sure, it's true. A lot of what you're talking about Stephanie, really depends on your demographics. I have over a 90% pre-booking rate, and I track those I want to come back - and I contact them personally through a call or a written note if I don't see them. I use salon software (Vagaro) that makes it very easy to email marketing materials and I've made a deliberate choice not to, because I know without a shadow of a doubt that my clients appreciate that I don't fill their in-box.

There is no one size fits all, even within the same industry. The first step of any marketing plan (or starting a business for that matter) is knowing who your clients are (are who you want them to be) - and without that you're still just shooting in the dark, and maybe killing off a client or two in the process! I'm not saying that email, text and internet advertising don't work - obviously they have their place and can really have an impact depending on your demographics. I am just saying, not every client is one who will appreciate the emails/texts - and many are even reluctant to give it, so have another plan in place - preferably one as personal as the services you offer!
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
 Reply
#40
(08-29-2012, 06:42 PM)Onykophile Wrote: what worked for me was to print a new customer offer on the back of my cards. I gave a $5.00 discount to the new client as well as to the existing client who referred the new client.


Worked for us too over here in Sweden. We also modified the cards and gave to the hairstylists in our small town so they got commission by referring customers. Worked better than any ads we did, or our salon website (which was professionally designed). This was in the dark ages before Facebook of course ;-)
Iryna Giblett Nail Products Inc., Sweden
http://www.irynagiblett.com
 Reply
#41
I had my website redesigned by a web designer last year, it has been highly optimized and I added my online booking to it. The next thing I'm going to do is add a blog. My website is the #1 thing that increases traffic to my studio, much better than referrals - I even do the same referral thing that Bob and Maggie suggested above. It wasn't cheap to have it done but I've definitely recouped my costs and then some. What cost the most was incorporating the ability to go in and update it myself, without having to pay my web guy to do it for me. The most important thing though, is to optimize it. You have to think like a consumer and know what search terms to use.

Just a note about Flash - don't use it - it's not supported by iPhone. And quite honestly I will not sit and wait for the Flash intro on any site - I suspect others feel the same way.
Laura Merzetti
http://www.scratchmyback.ca
CND Education Ambassador
Toronto, Ontario Canada
 Reply
#42
Avoid Flash and don't add music. Music seems perhaps cool the first visit, but irritates like crazy with every additional visit.
Iryna Giblett Nail Products Inc., Sweden
http://www.irynagiblett.com
 Reply
#43
Ditto on the music Wink
Laura Merzetti
http://www.scratchmyback.ca
CND Education Ambassador
Toronto, Ontario Canada
 Reply
#44
(09-02-2012, 09:45 PM)CandiceAE Wrote: That's a fairly standard saying in the marketing world, and for sure, it's true. A lot of what you're talking about Stephanie, really depends on your demographics. I have over a 90% pre-booking rate, and I track those I want to come back - and I contact them personally through a call or a written note if I don't see them. I use salon software (Vagaro) that makes it very easy to email marketing materials and I've made a deliberate choice not to, because I know without a shadow of a doubt that my clients appreciate that I don't fill their in-box.

There is no one size fits all, even within the same industry. The first step of any marketing plan (or starting a business for that matter) is knowing who your clients are (are who you want them to be) - and without that you're still just shooting in the dark, and maybe killing off a client or two in the process! I'm not saying that email, text and internet advertising don't work - obviously they have their place and can really have an impact depending on your demographics. I am just saying, not every client is one who will appreciate the emails/texts - and many are even reluctant to give it, so have another plan in place - preferably one as personal as the services you offer!



I also use Vagaro (which I love) But are you aware your clients can "opt out" of receiving marketing emails from you using this system? They just choose the option themselves - that way there is no guessing on your part. This assures you only clients who want to be offered specials receive the emails, therefore you wont be filling their inboxes with unwanted emails. It also gives you the ability to specify exactly who you want to email sent to. Say for instance you only want to advertise a Prom special to just your high school clients or a discounted fill in for just your clients who wear enhancements or send an email reminder to book ahead for upcoming holiday time. I use Vagaro email marketing with lots of success and I never have to worry about ticking off clients who don't want the emails. Surprisingly only about 10 out of the 200 or so clients I have registered emails for have opted out of receiving marketing emails. Vagaro email marketing allows you to specifically target who you advertise to and you can make it as personal as you wish. Just thought you might not be aware Vagaro allows you to choose the demographic you want to contact with your email advertising.
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#45
Hey, I have to admit I didn't read this thread. I just skipped to the bottom. I am a bit torn since I have written a monthly marketing journal for nail techs at $37. However We did not have enough subscribers to make it work. I have come to the conclusion that nail techs just don't want to market themselves.
Erick Westcott, CEO
Gelousy Gel Nail Systems
http://gelousy.com
 Reply
#46
It is great that Vagaro allows you to email market and clients can opt out - I'm aware of the feature, I just know that for a large percentage of my clients it would not be appreciated, and in this very personal business we are in, they would feel rude to opt out Smile Again, it all comes down to the demographics of your clients. I'm not really trying to say DON"T email - just that you should know who your client is first, and proceed with caution.

Erick, really? You assume that because we don't want to pay you specifically $37/month that it means we just don't want to market ourselves? I'm really sorry to say this, but the comment just sounds petulant. I purchased (and got a refund) on your business building system a couple years ago, and you did have some good basic ideas in it that could help people. Why don't you throw out a couple great ideas here (as others have taken the time to do) - maybe some people who are ready to jump in will be so inspired by your system that they will buy in?

I was just talking to my husband this weekend about the incredible lack of easily accessible information for our industry. I know everyone just needs to make a living, but hiring a business coach would run $150-300/hour, champ camp or the like run to the thousands by the time you pay for travel. Most people simply can't afford that. There are a few marketing/business systems with monthly fees (I've tried a few of them) that just don't have the value for dialing down into our specific business - they tend to be so generic that they don't really lighten the load much for what they cost. Everything I've invested in over the past four years turned out to be terribly general, sometimes lazy in the lack of detail, and really didn't offer much that we can't find by just googling and learning from others. Our schools are sad, because for all the money, you just learn to pass the state board. Yes, we have trade magazines - and they have some useful information, but I'm afraid I don't put much stock in them - primarily because I've been a contributor to both of our national magazines (by their request) many times now, and it disappoints me because, seriously, I've only been licensed for four years and I've been referred to as an industry expert? What??? Smile

This is supposed to be a FREE forum for helping each other and sharing ideas. That's why I continue to come on here when I don't personally benefit much except getting to network with my nail tech co-workers! I primarily answer business related questions, because I come from a finance background, and the business end of what we do is probably where the biggest shortage of information exists in our industry. During my first couple years, I had some generous people helping me, both on and off the forum. Now I regularly take phone calls and respond to emails from nail techs all over the country who have questions. Unless people who have figured things out will share information, the answers are only usually available if they have hundreds (or thousands) of dollars to spend.




Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
 Reply
#47
(09-10-2012, 02:22 AM)CandiceAE Wrote: It is great that Vagaro allows you to email market and clients can opt out - I'm aware of the feature, I just know that for a large percentage of my clients it would not be appreciated, and in this very personal business we are in, they would feel rude to opt out Smile Again, it all comes down to the demographics of your clients. I'm not really trying to say DON"T email - just that you should know who your client is first, and proceed with caution.

Erick, really? You assume that because we don't want to pay you specifically $37/month that it means we just don't want to market ourselves? I'm really sorry to say this, but the comment just sounds petulant. I purchased (and got a refund) on your business building system a couple years ago, and you did have some good basic ideas in it that could help people. Why don't you throw out a couple great ideas here (as others have taken the time to do) - maybe some people who are ready to jump in will be so inspired by your system that they will buy in?

I was just talking to my husband this weekend about the incredible lack of easily accessible information for our industry. I know everyone just needs to make a living, but hiring a business coach would run $150-300/hour, champ camp or the like run to the thousands by the time you pay for travel. Most people simply can't afford that. There are a few marketing/business systems with monthly fees (I've tried a few of them) that just don't have the value for dialing down into our specific business - they tend to be so generic that they don't really lighten the load much for what they cost. Everything I've invested in over the past four years turned out to be terribly general, sometimes lazy in the lack of detail, and really didn't offer much that we can't find by just googling and learning from others. Our schools are sad, because for all the money, you just learn to pass the state board. Yes, we have trade magazines - and they have some useful information, but I'm afraid I don't put much stock in them - primarily because I've been a contributor to both of our national magazines (by their request) many times now, and it disappoints me because, seriously, I've only been licensed for four years and I've been referred to as an industry expert? What??? Smile

This is supposed to be a FREE forum for helping each other and sharing ideas. That's why I continue to come on here when I don't personally benefit much except getting to network with my nail tech co-workers! I primarily answer business related questions, because I come from a finance background, and the business end of what we do is probably where the biggest shortage of information exists in our industry. During my first couple years, I had some generous people helping me, both on and off the forum. Now I regularly take phone calls and respond to emails from nail techs all over the country who have questions. Unless people who have figured things out will share information, the answers are only usually available if they have hundreds (or thousands) of dollars to spend. "



For some reason it didn't end the above quote, so my response starts here:

I completely agree with you on the lack of information in this industry! It honestly takes a self starter to succeed as a nail tech because no one want to help tell us how to do it. Let's face it, any other job would help train you to be able to succeed. In this industry they litteraly throw you out there with little to no training (school is a joke) and most fail and walk away, which is why the American nail tech is a dying breed! State board doesn't care if you know how to be a "successful" nail tech, they are only there to teach the basics. Which I think is wrong! I think learning how to run a business is AS important as knowing technique. Especially with the economy the way it is and the job market being at an all time low why not help those people who have talent to get a job how to actually succeed in that job?? It frustrates the heck out of me! I am successful because I stuck with being a nail tech though all of its ups and downs and literally learned through all my past employers short comings. I took all the information I had from 10 yrs of experience working from others and decided I could do it better, and I have. But it hasn't been an easy road! I will say to keep this thread on track, Marketing was my #1 reason why I am a success!!! Advertise, websites, word of mouth!!! I can't stress it enough. The thing you absolutely need to realize is you HAVE to spend money to make money!!! It is expensive to advertise yes, but if you comit you will make it all back and build a business. But yes having someone teach this would be priceless!!!


Gina, nail tech. NC
 Reply
#48
I'm working on my retail shelf talkers this morning and came across something I had forgotten - this is more marketing to people once you have them in your chair. For what it takes to actually get someone to try you, I think it's worth it to make the first appointment a good one, and give them something to come back in. When I have a new client, I have them fill out a client info sheet and also give them a goody bag to take home. You could use any kind of bag, I have pink & purple box bags with handles that are made of plastic and you fold together because I got them on closeout when I opened my salon.

One thing I only used in the goody bags during the first six months of opening (but I'm considering using them again) is a little bounce back card that I had printed on business cards through Vista Print. It has four offers printed on it (with a 60 day expiration date) and when they use an offer I put my initials on that space. The offers (1) 20% off your retail purchase (2) $20 off any two services booked together (3) 10% off your retail purchase, and (4) $10 off any one service.

Obviously the amount of my offers is based on my prices being on the higher side for nails in our area - your numbers might look different than mine. I'm not a huge fan of coupons or discounting - but I do think we can creatively bundle services or give things (like the bounce back) as a "thank you" to new clients.

Back when I used this offer I had the "$10 off any RockStar Service for new clients" printed on my business cards, and the bounce back card was designed to get them back two more times and to encourage retail purchases.

After they've been in three times, they will have points through the loyalty program to spend, will have seen someone win the monthly pre-booking contest, and maybe will have referred a friend and received their referral bucks.

Here's what else is in my goody bags in case anyone wonders:
-service brochure
-3 or 4 business cards
-candy
-tealight candle (I sell candles in the shop)
-cuticle oil if they got an enhancement service
-Footlogix sample if they got a pedicure
-mini lotion if they got a manicure
-current specials (if I have one) printed on a little card for them to be able to hand out to friends to encourage referrals.
Candice
Nail Tech/Owner
http://www.PanacheNailStudio.com
 Reply
#49
JC Penney has a referral program where if you bring in a new client, you get a discounted or free service and the new client also gets one. I think it'd be a good idea to have something like that. I always learned in business school word of mouth is the number one way to market for free but people will complain more than they will talk about how good an experience is. If you reward them for bringing in new customers (which you hope they would if they enjoyed their experience), you have a better chance of having them tell someone about it.
 Reply
#50
For those of you considering Groupon:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/11...14613.html
Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
 Reply

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