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LED Lamps: OPI vs. Hand & Nail Harmony (Gelish)
#1
I am wondering if anyone can elucidate on the differences between the (1) OPI LED lamp and the (2) Hand & Nail Harmony 18G LED Lamp with regards to the number of bulbs and power.

The OPI lamp notes "32 strategically-placed, silicone-encapsulated LEDs."
The Hand & Nail Harmony lamp notes "18 2-watt LED lights."

Which one has more power and efficacy? The last time I saw the OPI lamp, I do not recall seeing 32 bulbs. I am going back to check next week but if anyone is currently using one then would you kindly verify for me? What is the OPI lamp wattage? Are the 32 bulbs 2-watt each? Huh

Many thanks.
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#2
(02-21-2012, 10:01 PM)cS Wrote: I am wondering if anyone can elucidate on the differences between the (1) OPI LED lamp and the (2) Hand & Nail Harmony 18G LED Lamp with regards to the number of bulbs and power.

The OPI lamp notes "32 strategically-placed, silicone-encapsulated LEDs."
The Hand & Nail Harmony lamp notes "18 2-watt LED lights."

Which one has more power and efficacy? The last time I saw the OPI lamp, I do not recall seeing 32 bulbs. I am going back to check next week but if anyone is currently using one then would you kindly verify for me? What is the OPI lamp wattage? Are the 32 bulbs 2-watt each? Huh

Many thanks.


I have both lamps and can say without reservation that both are fantastic lamps. I've used both of them on a range of gel polishes - I've used my OPI on Gelish and my 18g on OPI GelColor and never had a problem.

The 18g has 18 2-watt LEDs and HNH says that the 18G is 32 watts. But isn't 18 2-watt bulbs 36 watts? The OPI does have 32 smaller LEDs (don't forget the four lower down on the side, two on either side). I don't know the individual wattage, I'd guess 1, maybe 1.25 watt each, but the lamp says it is 40 watts. Remember that wattage is only a measure of input, not output.

From my experience with these lights, I'd say they are about equal in power and output. The things that differentiate them are less a matter of quality and more of personal preference. The OPI is black all-metal construction that looks a bit like Darth Vader's helmet; the 18g is a compact white plastic with a light shield. The OPI does not have a bottom, just feet to lift it for pedis; the 18g has a magnetic removable mirrored bottom. The OPI has a sensor strip towards the inside back that you touch to turn on - if you remove your hand, it stays on until the end of the cycle; the 18g is motion activated and if you remove your hand, the light shuts off. The 18g beeps at the end of a cycle, the OPI just turns off. The OPI has a HUGE countdown timer on top; the 18g has a small one in back where only the tech can see it. The OPI has four settings - 15, 30, 45 and 60 seconds; the 18g has three - 5, 20 and 30 seconds. Both do a great five finger cure, although the 18g seems to rely more on reflected light to get those awkward spaces on the sides of nails, especially thumbs, while the OPI has four LEDs set lower on the lamp and no reflective bottom. The 18g has a highly reflective interior top to bottom; the OPI is also reflective, but has no bottom.

So sorry to say, I can't definitively say which is better or which to choose because I love them both. I'd recommend going with the one recommended by the manufacturer you use most.
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#3
(02-21-2012, 10:01 PM)cS Wrote: Which one has more power and efficacy?


The lamp that has the most power and efficacy is the one that has been designed for the product you use.

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#4
THANK YOU Ms. NancySyd. That is quite informative! I didn't expect such a thorough response.

(02-21-2012, 11:35 PM)jb100680 Wrote: The lamp that has the most power and efficacy is the one that has been designed for the product you use.


My apologies for not being clearer. My interest lies in which lamp produces the most power and has the greatest coverage.

For me, investing in a LED lamp is (1) to save time and (2) to have even curing. Some colors require more curing time. Side walls and thumbs require special care to achieve even curing. A lamp that has the strongest UV-power output and the greatest coverage of the crescent-shape of a client's normal hand placement will compensate for any mishap that may occur during service (i.e. thick layers, improper hand placement, dark/glitter colors).
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#5
jb100680 makes an important point. I have three lamps (CND Shellac, OPI LED and HNH 18g) and use them all in accordance with manufacturer's instructions (mostly, I do experiment on my own nails with intermixing brands). Between the three lamps, I have everything I use covered. So my response was based on my use of many brands and lamps. Clearly, you should use the lamp for your system.

I think though that manufacturers are going to have to resolve this issue as there are now too many brands for techs to have the lamp for each one.
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#6
(02-21-2012, 11:35 PM)jb100680 Wrote: The lamp that has the most power and efficacy is the one that has been designed for the product you use.


My apologies for not being clearer. My interest lies in which lamp produces the most power and has the greatest coverage.

[/quote]

You were clear. I just don't think you get my point. A lamp is going to provide coverage for the hand. It will indicate if it's a 5-finger or 4 finger lamp. As far as what's the 'most powerful' UV output, that is not what you're looking for. What you need is the lamp with the CORRECT UV output that will activate the photo-iniators in the gel to cure your product you are using.

I'm sorry this is not what everyone wants to hear. But it is the truth. The only way that results can be guaranteed is if the product is used the way it has been tested. With the lamp for the system.

Anything else is just a guess.
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#7
(03-04-2012, 09:16 PM)jb100680 Wrote: A lamp is going to provide coverage for the hand. It will indicate if it's a 5-finger or 4 finger lamp. As far as what's the 'most powerful' UV output, that is not what you're looking for. What you need is the lamp with the CORRECT UV output that will activate the photo-iniators in the gel to cure your product you are using.

I'm sorry this is not what everyone wants to hear. But it is the truth. The only way that results can be guaranteed is if the product is used the way it has been tested. With the lamp for the system.

Anything else is just a guess.


(1) A 4-finger lamp increases service time. A five-finger lamp increases service time. A 10-finger lamp is ideal. Since this is not available in the market right now (like the Ikonna 10-finger UV lamp), we have to deal with what's available.

(2) Which lamp outputs the greatest range of "correct UV wavelengths" to cure the greatest number of gels available on the market?

I don't think many of us are looking for product guarantee. We work in real life situations that are often far removed from ideal laboratory conditions. Laboratory conditions give us guidelines to expound upon. Therefore, we have to guess. I prefer to call it "experimentation/hypothesizing."[/u]
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#8
(03-13-2012, 11:50 PM)cS Wrote: (1) A 4-finger lamp increases service time. A five-finger lamp increases service time. A 10-finger lamp is ideal. Since this is not available in the market right now (like the Ikonna 10-finger UV lamp), we have to deal with what's available.

(2) Which lamp outputs the greatest range of "correct UV wavelengths" to cure the greatest number of gels available on the market?

I don't think many of us are looking for product guarantee. We work in real life situations that are often far removed from ideal laboratory conditions. Laboratory conditions give us guidelines to expound upon. Therefore, we have to guess. I prefer to call it "experimentation/hypothesizing."[/u]


(1) Be careful with 2 hand UV lamps. It's harder to get a correct cure and the hand position is more important, because the light is less focused. That's why you don't see many of them.

(2) Well, at least 80% of the products out there are made in the same place. So those are going to be less proprietary, and would be more likely to work in any generic lamp. Check with the specific manufacturer.

If you're willing to take a guess on something like your professional reputation, than that is up to you.
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#9
just thought you all want to hear it from a man (gears head) point of view.
bouth light are great and do exactly what they were design/promisses to do.

one big difference is Light emitting dios are design to last 55 plus thousands hour, so common sence tell me that I will need a housing that can handle the abuse that long or out last those LED.
J Pham
No boundaries, just possibility.

http://www.facebook.com/jphamfb
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