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Walmart jumping into the SOGP revolution.
#1
Went shopping yesterday at Walmart, I was looking for a specific cheap nail polish that I want to try for stamping when I came across this.Confusedhock:
The starter kit cost $50 with a trial sample of the product, colors separately cost $10, but again they look like try me sizes.
I have to admit that their led lamp is cute and it seems that it has the different time settings.Smile

http://www.sensationailgel.com/
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#2
ParkNails :
> Went shopping yesterday at Walmart, I was looking for a specific cheap nail
> polish that I want to try for stamping when I came across this.Confusedhock:
> The starter kit cost $50 with a trial sample of the product, colors separately
> cost $10, but again they look like try me sizes.
> I have to admit that their led lamp is cute and it seems that it has the different
> time settings.Smile
>
> http://www.sensationailgel.com/




From what I understand this is the product/line that Vicki Peters helped to create.

Wal Mart is a prime example of DIY creators.

c'est la vie.
Anna
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#3
it was just a matter of time....
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#4
fred meyer has had one out for a while too. My client has it. but she still comes in to get her nails done with me, she just sometimes brings her own color.
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#5
Quote:From what I understand this is the product/line that Vicki Peters helped to create.

Sigh....

Really sad.
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#6
I can't imagine that you won't have the women who use this running back to your salons. This system has them buffing the natural nail, soaking in warm acetone for 15 minutes and using no solar/cuticle oil! As a DIYer myself, I wouldn't go near this.

I think you ought to be preparing for all the women who come in to you with damaged nails from this "system."
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#7
I just spent quite a bit of money for tickets and airfare to attend three professional hair/nail shows far from my home - to educate myself and stay current with the trends.

I will be going to these events this year a little more disenchanted. Really, are these companies going to go bankrupt if they don't provide the general public with a DIY gel polish kit?

I used to throw my money at these companies, so excited to experience great new products. However, now I will be much more inclined to price shop, ask for discounts, etc. Since it seems like most "professional only" companies now think they have the green light to approach our industry this way, I will not be shopping with such gusto or with much of a smile on my face.

Just sayin'...
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#8
Just reading the FAQ's on their page is going to be enough to scare my clients away from trying it themselves! Smile
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#9
Well let's see who they complain to when it chips after awhile or peels off cuz they didn't do it right.
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#10
This is what I think might happen:

By putting these non-professional systems out there, the beauty companies are diluting the professionalism of our industry and shooting themselves in the foot. Women are going to buy the systems and, yes, some of them will be successful. But many more of them will not and that will leave a bad taste in their mouth for these kinds of services. Either they will do some major damage to their nails, cause over exposure reactions or their nails just won't look good and the SOGP will chip off long before it's supposed to. This is not just polish-it doesn't come off with a swipe of acetone so the damage and mistakes will be right out there for everyone to see. Can you imagine how many people are just going to peel it right off instead of removing it safely? (You KNOW they will!)

And that's where the difference is between hair color sold in stores as opposed to salon color. Before anyone starts making comparisons, I think it's apples to oranges. Women can't remove hair color if they make a mistake (which is basically mistake-proof these days). If they need it to be fixed, they have to go to a stylist to fix a bad dye job. SOGP or even acrylic or gel that's sold in Wal-Mart can be readily peeled off causing some real damage to nails.

Eventually, women will feel that ALL SOGP (or whatever enhancement is being sold publicly) damages their nails or doesn't look right and they'll stop coming to us. Not realizing the damage they have done is done because these systems have a learning curve and needs a professional who makes it their job to learn it properly, they'll complain that SOGP, no matter who does it, is damaging to nails and they won't have anything to do with it. Look how many people won't get acrylic or any other nail enhancement because their nails had damage from improperly trained techs who cause major damage and infections!

Pretty soon, SOGP will be sitting on our shelves, gathering dust and no one will want it.

I'd like to find out the numbers from Sally Beauty how much of their Gelish is purchased with Pro Cards as opposed to regular customers or Beauty card customers. That would be an interesting market research.

I'd also like to find out how many women buy a system, try it and either take it back or else use it once and forget about it because it's harder to do than they thought. We are successful because of our repeat business. How many customers purchase the system and never return to buy more because it's just not worth it to them?

One of my clients is the department manager of the H&B aisle at our local Wal-Mart. She's going to do some informal research for me and see how many of the SOGP systems are returned. It's pretty pricey so I don't think many people will just let it sit on their counter tops if they don't like it. I bet they return it for their money back.

After all this, I can't fail to mention that it's one of our OWN who has set this in motion. Of all the people in the industry, I never thought for one minute she would betray us-someone who writes information for your M'Lady textbooks and educates professionals! I almost can forgive a corporation who already had a system in place for the beauty industry, but this person has bypassed her fellow nail techs completely and taken the product directly to the public.

No wonder we have to fight to be taken seriously.
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#11
NailRising wrote:
Quote:From what I understand this is the product/line that Vicki Peters helped to create.

How do you know that?

I went to http://www.nailene.com the company who manufactures this product. I noticed this company sells all types of nail systems to comsumers. This concept is not new.

Did anyone else notice how in the trouble shooting section it really goes into detailed explanations as to how to get the best results from the product?

http://www.sensationailgel.com/#faq
http://www.nailene.com/UVGel_InstructionSheet.pdf

Heck when we first got to use most sogp, (WE - profressionals) had to figure out what was going on with the product here on BT- there were no detailed tech notes to fall back on nearly 18 months to two years ago. SOGP is so user friendly now - a DIY dream.

Enhance
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#12
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1...=3&theater
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#13
enhanced :
> NailRising wrote:
>
Quote:From what I understand this is the product/line that Vicki Peters helped
> to create.
>
> How do you know that?
>


I recall discussion either here on on FB about VP working with a company (major discount brand) sold at Walmart, Walgreens, etc.
Anna
 Reply
#14
I must absolutely and strenuously disagree with you, Harmonysky. I think yours is an overreaction to a fundamental change in the market. And I don't think that people who venture into the consumer market are traitors to the industry.

The product to compare is not DIY hair color, it is what we've had for decades - polish. Women have had access to regular polish (and other products) forever and yet have gone to salons - Why? Skills and service.

As an industry researcher and analyst, I think that the availability of consumer targeted SOGPs will not damage the salon part of the industry at all. In fact, quite the reverse. The data shows that gel based products are drawing women into salons like crazy, especially women new to regular manicures. 60% of the new market is in gel products. Women are seeing the benefits of SOGP - which is why the Walmart brand is coming out. Gel products address the major reasons women did not use salon services. The data is clear - women are coming back to salons for this service. Yes, consumer products will take a chunk of the pie, but it will be a much larger pie than in the past.

While some small percentage of women will be DIYers, the majority of women wanting gel polishes will go to salons eventually. They'll give up on DIY, not on the gel product. But, and this is a big but, salons and techs better know their stuff and do it right. Go on the DIY boads, you'll see lots of women having bad experiences with gel polishes - but the majority of them are having the bad experience at the hands of professionals. Ultimately, clients come to you, not because you have access to certain products, but because you simply do it better and give a better experience. As long as that is true, there is no problem.

I think complaining about the loss of people to DIY kits or calling business people traitors is useless. Like with elevators operators, typewriters and 8-track tapes, technology moves us forward and leaves some things behind. The skill is adapting to the change; It is useless to resist it. [/i]
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#15
Thanks for that FB link! I remember seeing that pick before but it didn't register until now.

Geesh - so this is the trend. Our guru nail educators, now giving away trade techniques (information we paid dearly for in their classes). These "pro tips" to the public will make DIY think the results they get are on par with professionals.

I'm not threatened by this, it annoys me at how our industry leaders found another way to make hugh profts of sogp. They promote new products to me to introduce to my clients, who in turn will refer new business to me. AND they promote the same new product under a different name to the mass market - which eventually will diminishes the salon client pool. For example if I was targeting the teen population as a prospective client base, with this new wave home kits, my share of that market has grown smaller. It hard to imagine teens not trying this on themselves and friends too.

This trend just makes me think very hard about which industry guru I want to take a class from at this time in my career. If I can find them on youtube giving away "pro tips" for free - I'd think twice before I pay for another class.

Nancy wrote:
Quote:Women have had access to regular polish (and other products) forever and yet have gone to salons - Why? Skills and service.

With the trend of industry pros marketing sogp to DIY - the DIY is not looking for the "salon experience". She will never see the need to venture into salons - ever!
Why, because they are being lead to believe they can get good results at home.

Quote:As an industry researcher and analyst, I think that the availability of consumer targeted SOGPs will not damage the salon part of the industry at all. Women are seeing the benefits of SOGP - which is why the Walmart brand is coming out.


Yes Walmart is seeing the growth in this new area of nail care. When they have big industry names to back the product, its a hugh incentive to carry their line because of the hugh profits it will generate.

Quote:Yes, consumer products will take a chunk of the pie, but it will be a much larger pie than in the past.

Ya think!?! DIY will take a larger slice of that pie too! You bet it will be a "much larger pie than in the past", look at who's endorsing the consumer product - professionals who once geared their product line to industry pros ONLY!
Quote:While some small percentage of women will be DIYers, the majority of women wanting gel polishes will go to salons eventually.

You really believe this?
With an increase in consumer awareness due to mass marketing in many magazines READ not only by salon clients while in the salon waiting for their nail appointments - but also by anyone in any waiting room with magazines - I don't see the light at the end of the tunnel coming near anytime soon.

Quote: Ultimately, clients come to you, not because you have access to certain products, but because you simply do it better and give a better experience. As long as that is true, there is no problem.

Yes we know we are doing it better - its when the DIY are told their results will be "professional quality nails done at home" that gets me wondering W T F is going on here.

Quote:The skill is adapting to the change; It is useless to resist it. [/i]

"Adapting to the change", hmmm most of us do that all the time by updating our skills. With this new "game changer" trend happening with the industry leaders, what else do you propose to the educated nailtech now?

Enhance
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#16
Everything else aside, I wonder how many cases of DIY-dermatitis will pop up over the next few years.
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#17
All the more reason to stay with a SOG in a traditional jar. It looks more professional. The traditional SOG is a bit different product in viscosity so is a bit different but looks more professional compares to the bottles IMO
Ellen Torchia
Owner Too Much Fun
President SB&S Graphics, Inc
Replicator Graphics

Former Top 10 Competitor

"A mind once stretched by the imagination never regains it's original form."
 Reply
#18
I think a lot will give it a try, but if these same DIY'r's can't polish their own nails with regular polish, they're certainly not going to do any better with the sog. I forsee lots of the people either taking the stuff back, or getting as a gift, trying it, finding it's too much trouble and giving it away or putting in a drawer or closet somewhere. I also am willing to bet there's going to be some contact dermatitus issues as was mentioned. Most people are going to think the bulb in the lamp is still good because it's putting out light, right? They won't understand the need to change the bulb after so many hrs.

The DIY'r's blogs will tell people will give out all the tips and tricks, and honestly, those people who're able to do it for themselves weren't coming into our salons anyway. They've already had too many bad experiences in a NSS salon and they think we're all tarred with the same brush.
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#19
Have you ever tried polishing your right hand if you are right handed? It aint that easy!
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#20
I must be one of the few manicurists who doesn't use/offer SOG . . . no worries :wink:
Jaime Schrabeck, Ph.D. (yes, it's real)
http://www.precisionnails.com
http://shop.precisionnails.com
 Reply
#21
Donna in Huntsville, TX. :
> I think a lot will give it a try, but if these same DIY'r's can't polish their
>
> The DIY'r's blogs will tell people will give out all the tips and tricks, and
> honestly, those people who're able to do it for themselves weren't coming into
> our salons anyway. They've already had too many bad experiences in a NSS salon
> and they think we're all tarred with the same brush.




All they have to do is come here too right and learn as much as we do. This site is not FPO.
Anna
 Reply
#22
Quote:Donna in Huntsville, TX. :
> I think a lot will give it a try, but if these same DIY'r's can't polish their
> own nails with regular polish, they're certainly not going to do any better
> with the sog. I forsee lots of the people either taking the stuff back, or
> getting as a gift, trying it, finding it's too much trouble and giving it away
> or putting in a drawer or closet somewhere. I also am willing to bet there's
> going to be some contact dermatitus issues as was mentioned. Most people are
> going to think the bulb in the lamp is still good because it's putting out
> light, right? They won't understand the need to change the bulb after so many
> hrs.
>
> The DIY'r's blogs will tell people will give out all the tips and tricks, and
> honestly, those people who're able to do it for themselves weren't coming into
> our salons anyway. They've already had too many bad experiences in a NSS salon
> and they think we're all tarred with the same brush.

Well, the reality is that they won't have to deal with bulb issues because all the consumer brands use LED UV - those bulbs should certainly never go out just from consumer use!

But I want to say, as a DIYer, that we don't think ill of all nail techs; we know there are good and bad (and really bad) ones. Yes, some of us have had bad experiences at the hands of some bad techs, but I don't think most DIYers are DIYers because of bad experiences or out of a repudiation of professionals. More than others, we really get the training and education it takes. There's nothing like trying to do your nails yourself to make you appreciate the skills of a professional! I really enjoy doing my nails, I did with regular polish and I do with gel polishes. It's relaxing. I still go to my nail tech regularly. At my age, I can't quite twist myself into position to do my own pedicures!! Smile

I just don't think that these consumer brands or DIYers represent any threat to professional nail techs. Gel Polish has really expanded the market.
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#23
I feel like I need to chime in here, too. My opinion is that DIY'ers aren't ever going to hurt my business, and if the professional manufacturers want to boost their bottom line by creating a special line for DIY'ers, it's no skin off my nose. In fact, the more money the company makes, the more they can put into R&D for their professional products. And that benefits all professional nail techs in the end.

As for Vicki Peters giving input to the DIY nail manufacturers in the creation and education for their product--well, she's only doing on a grand scale what I do one-on-one with an individual who I'm concerned about and want to make sure they keep their nails healthy while doing them at home. DIY'ers exist, most of them are NEVER going to be our clients, and so they might as well be taught how to maintain the health of their nails while they're DIY'ing. Rather than impacting negatively on the nail industry, I think this is a very positive thing, for that reason.

By the way, I'm looking at my gross sales numbers for 2011, and I made $2500 more this last year than I did in 2010. A good percentage of that increase was from soak-off gel polish services. So I'm not ready to give up just because DIYers can do their own sogp now! I'm in it to win it! Smile
Elyse in WA
http://www.elysiumnailstudio.com
The Nail Princess is in.
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#24
Enhance,

This is not about what I believe, it's about what the data are showing and it's pretty positive for nail techs. The nail industry was not as hard hit by the recession as other areas of the industry, and it is now the fastest growing segment of the beauty industry. BLS and industry stats show a big growth in use of manicuring services, initially estimated at up 28% from 2006-2016, but actually growing more than that in the last 18 months - to the point that a nail tech is described as a "hot" profession. Of that growth, 60% is in gel services. So even if DIY/consumer products skim off 30% (unlikely) of that, you still have a very healthy level of growth. I'm not a tech anymore, so I tend to view this in a data-driven way. Like politics and real estate, the nail industry is local. So YMMV.

DIY is often the gateway to salon services. Remember, we were all DIYers in the beginning. A lot of women try DIY, but only a small percentage of them continue; the capital outlay alone is a big barrier to DIY for gel services. Regardless of what SensatioNails/ Walmart says, few women have the skills to do it properly, let alone achieve a professional result. Keep your eyes on eBay and Craigslist - those lights will up there soon. I know you all love to say that DIYers are not people who would ever come to (or that you would want in) your salons, but again the data show that to be WRONG! My own case certainly disputes that (and I'm a great client!).

The most significant threat to professional nail techs is not DIYers or consumer products, it's the persistence of health, safety and sanitation issues and concerns, especially in the media. From unsanitary pedicure spas, to concern over UV rays for gel services, to concerns about nail damage, that's the big issue. Professionals need to address that in an comprehensive and concerted effort.

So what's an educated nail tech to do in these changing times? You called it - updating and improving skills, but not just technical skills, but business management and people management skills. If women choose a pro over DIY, it will be because you do more, you do it better, safer and provide a better experience.
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#25
PS. Sorry for the lecture. I'm college faculty, it's just the way we are. :roll:
 Reply

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