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Full Version: Hourly wage and Natural nails.
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So I just recently met with a spa owner and she wanted to offer natural nails. so no acrylics, gel, uv lamp, etc.. and she wants the nail polishes to be free of nasty toxins. so this really limits my services to just manis and pedis, which is fine, less things I have to buy. I have been out of practice for a few years.
so she asked me if I wanted to do commission or be an employee? I told her I had to think about it. I do not know what an average hourly wage is for a manicurist, so I was wondering if some of you could help me out? I dont think its worth it to be commission because my services are so limited. also can anyone recommend natural products that they have used and liked.

Thanks,
Breanna
This bears repeating, please read this about commission: http://www.thisuglybeautybusiness.com/20...le-of.html

Also, it sounds like she could use some education about product chemistry . . . especially if that's her rationale for offering natural nail services only.
My salon provides natural nail services only and clients appreciate not being exposed to the smells associated with acrylics.

We only use OPI, CND, and Zoya - all are 3-free (Zoya is 5-free). Gel polish is 3-free and you can use LED lights if she wants to avoid UV.

Focus on the rest of the products- lotion, scrub, soak - the skin contact is a much bigger issue than what is put on dead tissue.


Polish isn't dangerous either . . . don't get suckered by the fear-based marketing around beauty products.

http://www.schoonscientific.com/download...e-Myth.pdf

http://www.schoonscientific.com/download...rganic.pdf
(06-02-2014, 05:04 PM)PrecisionNails Wrote: [ -> ]Polish isn't dangerous either . . . don't get suckered by the fear-based marketing around beauty products.

http://www.schoonscientific.com/download...e-Myth.pdf

http://www.schoonscientific.com/download...rganic.pdf

It's more than formaldehyde. Toluene and DBP are in many nail products. And it is also not just about contact - the real danger is in the volatile compounds they release into the air. While minimal danger exists from light exposure (your every other week pedi, for instance), nail techs themselves are inhaling those contaminants all day every day - that is the real concern for me!