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Full Version: Is there a difference between a bonder and a primer?
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Hi Everyone!

I'm just wondering if there is a difference between a bonder and a primer. Are the terms interchangeable? What is the difference if not?
When would you use a bonder as opposed to a primer?

Also, why/how do some of these products make a gel polish soak-off more difficult?

Thank you!
Inquiring minds want to know :-)
I was told that a primer prepares something for the next step and in the same way, so does a bonder. They're both preparing a surface for the next step of the service.

I think the terms are interchangeable but the ingredients are what's important.
Yes, there is a difference. I'm going to try my best to explain it correctly.

Acid primer acts as a dehydrator and mild corrosive, to open up the deeper layers of the nail plate. This causes small follicles to stand up on the surface of the nail plate. When you apply your product, it wraps around these small 'hairs' and attaches to the natural nail. Once dry the bond with the product is very deep.

Non-acid primers are comprised more of resins, designed to attach the product to the natural nail without etching the surface first. There are air dry bonders and UV bonders. You can use air dry bonders with gel or acrylic. UV bonders are for gel only.

With either one, an important thing is to not use too much. When you apply either one to the prepped, dehydrated surface, they spread. Using too much will definitely cause lifting. If you're using a new bottle, dab the brush on a towel to wipe off the excess. And also make sure it's dry completely. An acid primer will dry chalky and may take a minute or so. Non acid primer will stay sticky, but give it at least 30 sec or so before you apply product.

So, the reason that this makes soaking off the gel polish take longer is because it creates a deeper bond that takes longer to soak off. Because now the acetone needs to go deeper to break the bond.

In my opinion, if you're using good products with good application techniques, you don't really need acid primer. And I only use non acid primer if I'm applying something I don't intend to remove regularly. Just focus on a clean nail plate, and a smooth flush application. With gel, apply a thin layer to the nail plate in a scrubing motion to attach it. With acrylic, don't be afraid to press the product firmly around the cuticle area and sides. This should make a big difference.
That's great info - I'm really wondering if I'm heavy handed in applying bonder/primer now.
Thanks!!!
(09-30-2013, 09:57 PM)jb100680 Wrote: [ -> ]Yes, there is a difference. I'm going to try my best to explain it correctly.

Acid primer acts as a dehydrator and mild corrosive, to open up the deeper layers of the nail plate. This causes small follicles to stand up on the surface of the nail plate. When you apply your product, it wraps around these small 'hairs' and attaches to the natural nail. Once dry the bond with the product is very deep.

Non-acid primers are comprised more of resins, designed to attach the product to the natural nail without etching the surface first. There are air dry bonders and UV bonders. You can use air dry bonders with gel or acrylic. UV bonders are for gel only.

With either one, an important thing is to not use too much. When you apply either one to the prepped, dehydrated surface, they spread. Using too much will definitely cause lifting. If you're using a new bottle, dab the brush on a towel to wipe off the excess. And also make sure it's dry completely. An acid primer will dry chalky and may take a minute or so. Non acid primer will stay sticky, but give it at least 30 sec or so before you apply product.

So, the reason that this makes soaking off the gel polish take longer is because it creates a deeper bond that takes longer to soak off. Because now the acetone needs to go deeper to break the bond.

In my opinion, if you're using good products with good application techniques, you don't really need acid primer. And I only use non acid primer if I'm applying something I don't intend to remove regularly. Just focus on a clean nail plate, and a smooth flush application. With gel, apply a thin layer to the nail plate in a scrubing motion to attach it. With acrylic, don't be afraid to press the product firmly around the cuticle area and sides. This should make a big difference.

great info, thanks!
Exactly what I was looking for! Thank you thank you!

(09-30-2013, 09:57 PM)jb100680 Wrote: [ -> ]Yes, there is a difference. I'm going to try my best to explain it correctly.

Acid primer acts as a dehydrator and mild corrosive, to open up the deeper layers of the nail plate. This causes small follicles to stand up on the surface of the nail plate. When you apply your product, it wraps around these small 'hairs' and attaches to the natural nail. Once dry the bond with the product is very deep.

Non-acid primers are comprised more of resins, designed to attach the product to the natural nail without etching the surface first. There are air dry bonders and UV bonders. You can use air dry bonders with gel or acrylic. UV bonders are for gel only.

With either one, an important thing is to not use too much. When you apply either one to the prepped, dehydrated surface, they spread. Using too much will definitely cause lifting. If you're using a new bottle, dab the brush on a towel to wipe off the excess. And also make sure it's dry completely. An acid primer will dry chalky and may take a minute or so. Non acid primer will stay sticky, but give it at least 30 sec or so before you apply product.

So, the reason that this makes soaking off the gel polish take longer is because it creates a deeper bond that takes longer to soak off. Because now the acetone needs to go deeper to break the bond.

In my opinion, if you're using good products with good application techniques, you don't really need acid primer. And I only use non acid primer if I'm applying something I don't intend to remove regularly. Just focus on a clean nail plate, and a smooth flush application. With gel, apply a thin layer to the nail plate in a scrubing motion to attach it. With acrylic, don't be afraid to press the product firmly around the cuticle area and sides. This should make a big difference.

As always Jesse - great info & thanks for the explanation ...I may be using to much bonder at times too ...I was thinking a bit extra (not like a ton ...just a bit) was good. I never use acid primer
You're welcome. Happy to spread the info Heart
Dumb QuestionS - OPI Bond aid - I know is non acid - is a bonder? Dehydrator? - then what is OPI Bondex?

Speaking in terms of brands I see a lot of people "using" YN protein bond. I try to use a system complete - but I occasionally see someone recommended this or that. Is there a difference in OPI Bond aid & YN Protein Bond for instance?

Thanks!
(10-02-2013, 07:38 AM)[email protected] Wrote: [ -> ]Dumb QuestionS - OPI Bond aid - I know is non acid - is a bonder? Dehydrator? - then what is OPI Bondex?

Speaking in terms of brands I see a lot of people "using" YN protein bond. I try to use a system complete - but I occasionally see someone recommended this or that. Is there a difference in OPI Bond aid & YN Protein Bond for instance?

Thanks!

Bondaid is just a rip-off Smile it's just 50-50 alcohol and acetone according to the MSDS, so it is a dehydrator.
[align=center]I figured "glorified" alcohol ** so it's totally different then YN Protein Bond then? OPI Bondex came in my Acylic sample kit - that's totally different too then.
Sorry :-) thanks soo much!
I love that everyone here helps so much with silly questions!