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revisiting old terrain, I've been experimenting with using dip under wrap or gel to strengthen some weaker nails
Linkage and similar products have so improved the adhesion of glue products like wrap I wonder if it will improve the usefulness of dip products, always worked for some....

Do you use "dip"? What brands do you like?

Q.... I'd always purchased powder intended for dipping (used to teach this product for a company, with wraps, ages ago), but an associate has told me she used regular acrylic powder, that it is the same product sold for "dip"...
really? anyone with the tech resources to know?


Recently had an interesting discussion with a tech in another city promoting a "gel dip", a client visiting with family had a fill there and was delighted to have an entirely ORGANIC product (one of the few I have who like to perpetually find flaws in my work but has returned for 20 years ;-) )... I was curious, called the tech...she tells me it is a gel, more questions expose it is a "lightless gel" and "entirely organic"... she insists.... describing a standard dip process but with elaborate terms... and no cure in a light

pesticide free polymers? ;-)

or·gan·ic
[awr-gan-ik] Show IPA

adjective
1.
noting or pertaining to a class of chemical compounds that formerly comprised only those existing in or derived from plants or animals, "but that now includes all other compounds of carbon."

Organic is such a misleading term. It is not like "certified organic" used for food - it is anything carbon based which includes pretty well EVERYTHING that you can touch.

2.
characteristic of, pertaining to, or derived from living organisms: organic remains found in rocks.

3.
of or pertaining to an organ or the organs of an animal, plant, or fungus.

4.
of, pertaining to, or affecting living tissue: organic pathology.

5.
Psychology . caused by neurochemical, neuroendocrinologic, structural, or other physical impairment or change: organic disorder. Compare functional ( def 5 ) .
I know, I think it is a cheap capitalizing on the customers understanding of "organic"
I explained the fossil fuel thing, client was baffled
When they read "organic" most people think of pesticide free spinach


So first off I'm a new technician. I rarely get an opportunity to work on enhancements but recently decided I want my nails done. Because if I want enhancements I get them done because it takes me like FOREVER to do my own and I just don't have time. I figured I'd go somewhere cheap get them done and fix to my approval.
The place I went to did a silk wrap extension then did acrylic dip over it. I was pleased over all. Since I'll be doing nails etc. though I decided to do a hard gel over the job because her job would not withstand my job. I think I'm going to start working on nails like this. I really like the outcome.
What was the product? I've used Nexgen nails & loved it however pricey if you want the dip in colors!
The USDA is the body that certifies foods as being "organic" - this means they are free from chemical pesticides - You can think of it like this: an apple is organic in that it is a carbon-based object, but once you add synthetic pesticides to it, it is no longer 100% organic because it now has non-organic residue.

The FDA regulates cosmetics, and it does not have an organic standard. A product can be considered organic under USDA standards, but it still must be regulated as a cosmetic under FDA regulations (which are a huge joke).

Cosmetics are typically labeled as having organic ingredients - this means they have some amount of USDA certified jojoba oil, shea butter, etc - but then they have other non-organic ingredients and synthetic ingredients as well. There is no way any gel polish is organic within the USDA guidelines - which states a product must be made from 95% certified organic ingredients to be called organic, and if it is 70% it can be labeled "made with organic ingredients". It would kind of be like saying a tennis ball is organic because it has some natural rubber in in.



Hi there, new here but saw this post and wanted to add in any help to your question on the dip powders:

Here in French Canada the "dip" system is very popular, but we call it resin and powder. (At least I believe this is the same thing that in the states as marketed as dip, correct me if I'm wrong).

The dip powder is like you said- just acrylic powder. I prefer personally to use acrylic powders usually marketed for use with acrylic systems, from nicer brands (such as young nails) instead of the dip powders sold specifically for dipping.
Let's not generalize here. Dip systems are not at all popular in Alberta. In Calgary acrylic is still dominant while in Edmonton gel rules. Maybe there are some areas in Canada that dip systems are popular, but not in my back yard.
(08-22-2013, 08:00 AM)clairebecca Wrote: [ -> ]Hi there, new here but saw this post and wanted to add in any help to your question on the dip powders:

Here in French Canada the "dip" system is very popular, but we call it resin and powder. (At least I believe this is the same thing that in the states as marketed as dip, correct me if I'm wrong).

The dip powder is like you said- just acrylic powder. I prefer personally to use acrylic powders usually marketed for use with acrylic systems, from nicer brands (such as young nails) instead of the dip powders sold specifically for dipping.


Thank you, that is good to know. If you use it a lot, with good results, can I ask what resin you use? I'd been using it with Elegant Glass, but having problems obtaining and quality... thinking of trying something new, last batch of silk I purchased had so much adhesive on it, can't it off the paper and the pattern of adhesive (used to be very light) shows through the silk.


I reads "resin" thinking, glue? When I think resin, I think of natureal materials like copal... or casting materials... Resin in the most specific use of the term is a hydrocarbon secretion of many plants, particularly coniferous trees.
Wisewgeek:Resin is a natural or synthetic compound that begins in a highly viscous state and hardens with treatment. Typically, it is soluble in alcohol, but not in water. The compound is classified in a number of different ways, depending on its exact chemical composition and potential uses. It also has many applications, ranging from art to polymer production, and many consumers interact with products that contain it on a daily basis.

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-resin.htm
to continue the terminology discussion (I see a lot of confusion for clients in "light-less gels", salons where they advertise "gel" without the inconvenience of the light that causes "cancer" (another discussion) so they charge more for basic acrylic or dip wrap or dip products.... calling it a product that is locally more expensive
wiki says
This is a list of various types of glue. Historically, the term "glue" only referred to protein colloids prepared from animal flesh. The meaning has been extended to refer to any fluid adhesive.
There are many adhesive substances that are considered or commonly referred to as "glue":

Synthetic monomer glues:
Acrylonitrile
Cyanoacrylate ("Superglue", "Krazy Glue")
Acrylic
Resorcinol glue
Synthetic polymer glues:
Epoxy resins
Epoxy putty
Ethylene-vinyl acetate (a hot-melt glue)
Phenol formaldehyde resin
Polyamide
Polyester resins
Curious now- if I have read these threads correctly- would dipping any powder etc not potentially cause huge over exposures issues to the client ?
(08-23-2013, 06:55 PM)mrs o Wrote: [ -> ]Curious now- if I have read these threads correctly- would dipping any powder etc not potentially cause huge over exposures issues to the client ?

over exposure to what?

Gelpro- sorry if I confused you, I specifically said here in French Canada it's popular but I guess I should have been more specific saying Quebec. It's funny how its the be-all end-all system here but elsewhere it's not popular at all (imo I understand why, I'm NOT a fan of resin & powder)

Wendynailart- to help answer some of your questions I will explain a little my experience.

The dip systems we have here include 2 resins: there is a very thin viscousity glue (if I am not mistaken its the exact same glue used for nail tips we see in those tubes, or brush on resin) and is usually called the "sealing glue". We then have the actual "resin" which is just a thick viscousity glue and I think that when these lightless gel systems are advertised, they're referring to this thick resin as immitating the finish of a gel, since when it dries it is somewhat thick and ready to be filed much just like you can gel/acrylic. Typically for a nail when doing this I would apply the thick resin, dip the nail in acrylic powder, then "seal" it by laying this very thin glue over the top, then repeat the process. With the thick resin (depending on what brand you buy and the viscousity), sometimes you don't even have to dip it in the acrylic powder but of course it adds more strength. Typically I would dip the first resin coat in the acrylic, then seal it, then apply another thick resin coat but not dip and start filing.

In the end, this is basically just an inside out acrylic method when you think about it. It's especially amusing because here there is this widespread notion that acrylic is evil and horrible for your nails and so old fashioned, only the cheap nail salons do that, etc. It holds the same amount as acrylic in my experience and when it starts to lift, it doesnt in fact lift, it usually starts cracking around the edges and is very annoying, even more so than traditional lifting.

To answer the last question YES it is horrible in terms of exposure in the sense that it is super messy (don't even get me started if you aren't doing a normal french manucure, when colours and glitters get involved its a nightmare). The products themselves don't have a strong odour and usually it doesn't reach the clients nose but for the nail technician, especially if you are like me and get very close, the glues can be very strong and burn the eyes. This happens with the sealing glue usually and sometimes the last top coat (which is just another form of resin)

I really hope I helped and I hope I explained myself well. In case it was missed I am not a fan of this system (not that anyone asked lol), its popular here because its easy to pick up for people less experienced and with all the fear mongering about acrylic. Theres no way to really shape or build a nail the way we would with acrylic or gel and filing is always recquired even with the smoothest application of resin. It's messy and the finished product never looks as good as it would with gel or acrylic. That being said I have only tried the glues offered here in Quebec at our local stores so I can't personally attest to the dip systems elsewhere available. I would think with some of the more well known brands available that offer the dip system the quality is probably better than some of the stuff that is popular here.




Great to see some techs who use dip systems. Ya know, dip systems have gotten a bad rap, but it is like any other system in that ya have to work with it and know its ins and outs. It can be a successful way to build a nail business.

Like Wendy said I loved Elegant Glass' resin but they discontinued it. Glad I stocked up!

I think you will find that regular acrylic powder is going to be a bit too thick. I would suggest trying Backscratcher's acrylic powder from their dip system. It is very fine and really easy to work with.

I would only double dip if I have an extreme problem client. Dipping twice will make a lot thicker nail. The great thing about dip systems is that they make a very lovely, natural looking nail.

Exposure, IMO, is very limited. Not nearly as bad as regular l/p acrylic systems and it is suggested to not get too close to the resin to protect your eyes.

By actually using silk you can build a nail and next to someone's natural nail you can't tell the difference. Getting the right ratio of resin, acrylic and accelerator will make for a great finish that only needs a light buffing. If clients use their cuticle oil on a daily basis as instructed the cracking around the edges will be limited. As with any system, practice makes perfect.

Have to laugh at someone thinking nail products are organic!

Give it a go and practice, practice, hun!