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Full Version: Has anyone done just the pink fill on P & W?
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If the client's P & W looks fine on the white tip with no natural smile line showing, could I just fill in the pink where it has grown out from the cutile and leave the white alone until next time. If I do this should I charge less since I'm only filling in the pink?

Thanks!
Monti

(04-03-2012, 12:22 PM)Monti Wrote: [ -> ]
If the client's P & W looks fine on the white tip with no natural smile line showing, could I just fill in the pink where it has grown out from the cutile and leave the white alone until next time. If I do this should I charge less since I'm only filling in the pink?

Thanks!
Monti

Oops sorry forgot to tell you the P & W is acrylic

Monti
Yes you can and it's up to you if you wish to charge less, it would depend on if it's a regular client or not if it was me.
Just make sure you replace the apex where it should be as well.

Can I say the only reason I see that this has happened is because when you first applied the white, you must have placed it quite far up the nail for the clients natural nail to not be showing through with regrowth, just be careful doing this as you don't want to make the original set look stumpy.
I have never know a P&W to not need the white rebalanced at the same time as the pink unless it's for the reason I mentioned.

sobeit

This is a regular fill to me. A fill of any color at the cuticles outgrowth is a fill. A backfill is the white placement being redone. I charge more for a backfill and would never charge a backfill price for a regular fill.
I would do a regular fill and charge accordingly ,if you used a cover powder ,however ,when the original set was done ,just make sure your pinks match ,and you don't use a different color ,like clear ,natural ,or translucent pink by mistake...
Lots of techs do this - sometimes even over artwork that has grown out but the client still likes it.
Some clients have nails that grow slowly . . . ideal candidates for 3 or 4 week standing appointments.