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> Tips may be easier to learn with - but if you think that being a professional
> Nail Technician is easy...........then you are either extremely talented/experienced
> or you are not doing a very good job.

I think you are way off base on this one.. there are many techs who just can not master forms and sculpts and make lovely nails in a reasonable amount of time with tips.. A good eye will allow you to pick up the right size tip on the 1st try and not "dick around" with the tips in the box.. it only can take extreme time if you knock the tip box on the floor Smile

I would like to think that some of these techs can be taught to work with forms and sculpt, but not all.. I belive it is a talent that can be learned by some but not all.. just because you tip not sculpt does not make you a bad or lesser qualified tech.

I personally fought with several types and brands of both metal and paper forms.. it was several years into my tech life when driving home from a show with a girl who was a model at a comp.. she was telling me every and I mean every detail of the experience (5 hours in the car .. it was very every detailed!!). She was telling me about how the competitor doubled up the paper forms.. got me intrigued.. I asked some questions.. umm here on my boards or maybe it was the mailing list I also manage, about this double paper form idea.. and found out why.. it gives the form more substance and allowed me more control over placing the form and getting it to stay where I put/wanted it.. that was when I put the tip box away and only dumped it n the floor one more time since..

> AND if your client is committed to the long term upkeep of her nail enhancements,
> how will you ever grow out the natural nail if you keep her in tips?

Some clients do NOT want their own nails underneath.. some are very happy with tips or sculpts and could care less or do not want an overlay situation..


> I may be mistaken but I would find it hard to believe that any Nail Tech that
> has perfected sculpting would ever go back to tips - other than "Party Nails"


I prefer sculpting.. I happened to have been very good at it from day one.. but I actually found it easier and faster to tip than sculpt whenI started.. as I perfected my technique, learned to work with a form that worked with me instead of aginst me, I truned to about 95% sculpting.. I do find that in some cases, on some people, tips actuall;y worked better for them and their nails & life style. Others did very well with sculpts.. it really depended on the client.


> Come on sculpting pros; am I out to lunch on this one?
> :cry: :roll: :wink:
Posted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 4:01 pm Post subject:

Quote:Some do not need to.. some reach out in other ways such as this forum.. if they want help it's there for the asking

Deb, reading here does help newbies in many ways. Not too sure what your point was though.

There are some things that need to be seen in order for a newbie to understand what is going on. For example, you can always tell some one what a bead of acrylic is supposed to look like but actually being shown what it looks like can make a world of difference in a newbies progress. Telling someone that taking only the shine off the nail can be taken by some techs a taking out a file and etching the crap out of the nails prior to putting on a set of nails. Some folks have to be shown what you mean.

Sherri, does the assistant do the same things for your other nail techs too? Does the assitant charge each tech a "per service" or do the other techs just pay the assistant a flat fee?

The assistants here are paid by the salon, and are tied up with the stylists most of the time. When I can get help from one of them I will tip them for setting up my pedi or what ever task I need done.

It would be nice to have an assistant for our nail department, but it's only seven techs vs the 30 or so stylist and I don't think the salon will pick up the tab for a nail assistant. We techs have thought about how we can get an assistant for our department but haven't work out a good pay system since some techs only work pt.

How many other techs reading here, who are newbies have built a full book within the past (two) years? Just curious?

Enhance
Quote:> Most newbies won't have an opportunity to work closely under an experienced
> nail tech or be able to take over an established techs clientele.

Some do not need to.. some reach out in other ways such as this forum.. if they want help it's there for the asking

Quote:Deb, reading here does help newbies in many ways. Not too sure what your point was though.

There are some things that need to be seen in order for a newbie to understand what is going on.

I believe if we took a survey, more techs work alone rather than with other techs hence no immediate access to any type of reaching out. Local techs will NOT let others watch or help in any manner as a general rule. With today's technology more and more are reaching out to forums and other tools online.. the availability of streaming video today all these techniques can be SEEN today.
Quote:With today's technology more and more are reaching out to forums and other tools online.. the availability of streaming video today all these techniques can be SEEN today.

Cool! Good to know we will be seeing (more) techniques here.

Enhance
My assistant helps all the techs except the boothrenters. If they want an assistant they can pay for it.

My assistant is paid hourly and often receives tips from clients as well.

I had an assistant even when I worked alone.
How much do you pay them...your assistant I mean?
Sherri,

I agree with "is so simple it’s almost silly!"

I've been doing nails for 18 yrs. Nail Tech come and go but most don't ever get the importance of building a relationship with their clients.

I could not have articulated any better what you said at the beginning of this post. I'm going to print it and share it with the new Nail Techs.

Thank You
Peggy
Well I've done the 50% thing and it has worked for me so Id recommend it!

Not fantastic at scupting yet so tips is the way for me, in any case a lot of my clients have nails that curl when they grow so long, or have a minging yellow colour to their own nail that shows when they turn over their hand so every so often they ask to have new tips as the oldies grow out.

Sculpting is cool though, and no more tips to buy Big Grin |that is a good thought!
As much as I am on this forum, I don't see how I missed this post.

1. If the nail tech is a true artist, it should be very difficult to tell if she has used tips or sculpting forms. It's not what is used, it's the end result, great looking nails. Watch TT in her video do a sculpt and a tip and when she is done they look the same, both beautiful.

2. Advertising. I have always heard that people have to see or hear of something 7 times. I have been asking my cleints how they heard of my salon, they said, "seeing my sign going back and forth to work everyday so I stopped in today." If this is true then they remembered my salon sign with in 4 days.
I am getting know for the salon who doesn't advertise. I like to save my money not give my money away. I honestly think it would be cheeper and more effective to give a dollar to each cleint then to give it to a newspaper or radio station. I learned in the beginning of my nail career that word of month works the best, so I no longer advertise because that is money I am spending in hopes someone will open the newspaper and actually read my ad, or change the radio station just as my ad is being announced, hopes doesn't pay the bills. Instead of paying someone else to spead the word, I do it myself using the 3 foot rule. Anyone with in 3 feet of me, I give them a business card. I do not go into detail, most time not say my name. I hand it to them, tell them where it's at and change the subject or walk away and let them change the subject to nails, as I walk away they ask my name. I do this because people have busy lives and most aren't interested in hearing a sales pitch. I find by letting them direct the conversation works best cause they don't feel pressured and actully remember me the next time they see me other then the person finding the card while digging in her purse and thinking to herself, "I was in such a rush and she just wouldn't stop talking."
Nancy,

You are so right. The cost of advertising is very hard for a small business. I also have used flyers and business cards to promote my business. On the back of my business cards, I have $10.00 off a set of nails or a fill-in for new customers only. The other thing that gets me tons of referrals is the use of Thank You and Thank You for the referral greeting cards. My clients rave about the fact that I take the time to thank them for coming to me and for their referrals. They are always thanking me for the cards. I also send them Birthday cards. They have no doubt to how much I appreciate them. This is MY best way of getting new customer. I get lots of referrals. I have several flyer's developed if any one wants a copy just email me and I'll send it to you. You will need publisher to modify them with your contact information. The greeting cards I use is an on-line card service the cards are less than $1.00 ea. My email is [email protected]
Thank you for all of your information...I work at a day spa, and am trying to get clients in for gel nails. Your tips will really help me to get return clients in for nail services...I want to have more local people come in to get services done, but it is a small town(I work in Galena, IL), but there are a lot of tourists that come in. So, we have clients, but they all don't return on a regular basis...Would like more clients to do services on. Again, thank you, for your tips, they will really help.
jackieo
I agree with all of that what if your not working for yourself though. I work for a salon and receive hourly. I do not always get to discount my services and do not have access to their addresses to give thank-you notes. I do talk with allot of clients in the salon and hand out my card everyday. So why in five months that I have worked at my salon am I not that busy???? I do not do artificial nails only natural. I also have tried to contact my previous clients with postcards and offered a 15% off mani and pedie. I have not had a full book yet. Am I doing something wrong somewhere??????? Thanks Katja
I found this old post and thought I would bump it to the top again being there are so many of us newbies here!

Great info!
quality of work is very important as well...i have my nails done by this one guy he is seriously the best...im VERY pick and i have been to SOO many people to get my nails done and i have never found anyone better then him..and at his prices...and the only reason i have been to anyone else was because either he was busy or he was out of town because he leaves out of town a lot lately because of personal reasons AND he still has his customers coming back to him...do you realize how good you have to be for your customers to come to you when you go out of town for 3 month at a time at least 2 or 3 times a year
Are you a nail tech? I'm just wondering because you state that quality of work is important (and I wholeheartedly agree) and I am curious to know what standards you use to judge quality? Is it speed? Nails don't come off? Sanitation? Creativity? Overall construction of the nails? Tips or sculpted? Design work? Custom blending colors to elongate or camouflage not-so-perfect nail beds? Does he compete in nail competitions or use this message board for education? Do you know what type of training he has or how long he has been licensed?

I'm not trying to open a can of worms here, just want you to be aware that just because nails stay on and the prices is low doesn't mean they are good quality.

Have you looked at any of the photos on this board to compare his work to others in the industry? what exactly is it about this man's work that you like and consider "quality"? The average consumer doesn't know anything, really, about proper sanitation, correct construction and form of a nail enhancement, electric filing vs. hand filing, what products are available, why primer burns, why acid primer is no longer necessary, that their nail beds and cuticle should not hurt during or after their service, and a million other things that make work "good quality".

I know plenty of techs in my town that do sub par work and they stay busy. Why? Mostly because they are cheap and take walk ins. Many of the techs at the McNails salons don't stick around very long. I've been in business for over 20 years in the same town. Can your tech say the same?
OK I have been doing nails about a year now and since the level I nail technician course I have not used tips I am using forms. I think a good nail tech would be able to use both, and not take too long with one and be quicker with the other. I have mastered the art of gluing the tips on with no air pockets, and struggle with blending just because I haven't used the tips in so long. I have had several people ask me if I sculpt or tip. I was taught that it completely depends on the client. The condition of their nails, lifestyle etc. I do feel that tips tend to breakdown in water. The water I was trained breaks down the cyan acrylate? can someone please clarify this for me.
wkdwich :

> Some clients do NOT want their own nails underneath.. some are very happy with
> tips or sculpts and could care less or do not want an overlay situation..

Maybe they just haven't found a nail tech that could maintain the natural nail properly?.
gelpro :
> wkdwich :
>
>> Some clients do NOT want their own nails underneath.. some are very happy with
>> tips or sculpts and could care less or do not want an overlay situation..
>
> Maybe they just haven't found a nail tech that could maintain the natural nail
> properly?.

Well I might think that would be one possability.. bur I also think there is a certain amount of people that just think the natural nail underneath gets stained, or seprates and icky in some manner.. but I guess you are right then.. if the tech was doing a good job with no seperation then maybe they would.. maybe I'm just really tired tonight Smile
I have to say that I am one of those that does not like having the natural nail underneath. While I can get them to the point that they do not seperate......it also gives me something to pick at. I'm a picker and if I have any natural nail showing I will and do pick at it. LOL For several years I was able to avoid the picking by putting a couple coats of glue on the underside and edges to make certain there was nothing to actually get hold of to pick at.

I know, weird huh?????!!!! LOL
I really like Sherri's post ...wow... I agree that post should be moved up to the top of the forum.

To be successful. You need a plan, like a blueprint for success which most nail tech's do not have.

Marketing is definitely the key. There's no way around it. Your success depends on how well you market your business.
Watch all latest nail trends and learn new skills.
I'm curious to know if all these things work if you are woring out of our home?????
I was going through the channels and i came up with this show called "downsizing" well this couple went to see a guy who helps you buget your money(forgot what they're called) and he said that you should give out....1,000 business cards a MONTH yes a month! WOW. so that means i have to get busy...theres this web site called Vista and i love it, they thought about everything. i get my business cards from there. i hope this helps.
letty
Hello everyone,

It's been a while since I've been here...

have to share-

forget business cards.

PENS are your best investment.

We don't throw away pens....

but think of how many business cards you've thrown away!

Use Appointment Reminder Cards for clients,

and give everyone else a pen!

(I order from pens.com)

Enjoy
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